Production Operator (Franklin, OH)

JOB DESCRIPTION:
-Production Operator will package quality approved product.

Job duties include:
-Read production schedule and performs assigned work
-Inspects, feed and/or packs products
-Ensures that product has correct lot information printed on it
-Build/assemble boxes
-Notify supervisor of any safety, quality, mechanical or material issues
-Place finished goods on correct pallets
-Maintain a clean, safe work area

HOURS: 7:20pm-7:30am

RAISES:
Pay increases are as follows: NO “call offs”/missed days, or tardies (unless previously approved by Supervisor) within the first 60 days, will receive a $.50 cent increase
NO call offs-missed days, or tardies (unless previously approved by Supervisor) within the first 120 days will receive another $.50 cent increase

DRESS REQUIREMENTS:
Jeans, Steel-Toe Boots/shoes. They will supply the safety shirts/vest. No Shorts!

ATTENDANCE:
Your attendance is vital! Anytime you miss work you put your job in jeopardy! If you call off in your first week they WILL let you go. Pay increases are as followed: NO Call offs – missed days unless previously approved by supervisor within the first 60 days, $.50 increase: NO Call offs – missed days unless previously approved by supervisor within the first 120 days, $.50 increase: Potential increase to $13.00 to start.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $12.00 /hour

Click here to apply via Indeed.com

You can also email your resume to a BARRYSTAFF recruiter at

recruiter@barrystaff.com

9 Things to Never Say in a Salary Negotiation

Posted by 

You’re 96% sure that you are ready to schedule a meeting with your boss to ask for a raise. Or perhaps you’re nearing the end of the job interview process and an offer is in sight. However, if you’re like me, you have definitely put your foot in your mouth a time or two saying the wrong thing at the absolute worst moment. Doh!

Don’t mess up. 

Don’t mess up.

No matter how many times you rehearse what to say, there’s always that risk of fumbling right at the five-yard line. Instead of panicking, get prepared.

To coach us along in the salary negotiation process, we turned to Josh Doody, author of Fearless Salary Negotiation. “A salary negotiation is a collaboration, and a key ingredient of a successful collaboration is good communication,” says Doody. “It’s important to be very clear with what you communicate to avoid ambiguity, which could complicate things and slow the negotiation process.”

Instead of Doody simply sharing the things you should say, he’s here to warn you about the potential negotiation landmines to avoid when angling for the salary you deserve. Here are 9 things to never say in a salary negotiation:

1. “Currently,” as in “I’m currently making…”

The most common question recruiters will ask a candidate is something like, “So where are you right now in terms of salary, and what are you looking for if you make this move?” Don’t fall for it.

“I call this The Dreaded Salary Question and it’s tricky because it usually comes up early in the interview process, and most candidates don’t think of it as part of a salary negotiation even though it is,” says Doody. “Answering this question by disclosing numbers can make it very difficult to negotiate effectively later on because it can box the candidate in. Once they disclose current or desired salary, the offers they get are very likely to be tied to those numbers. That can be very expensive if the company might have offered them a much higher salary than they disclosed.”

2. “Desired,” as in “My desired salary is…”

Don’t disclose your current or desired salary! “Recovering from this mistake can be tricky and each situation is unique. But one way to untether from those original numbers is to review the benefits package for deficiencies,” says Doody. “If the health insurance offering, paid vacation, target bonus or other aspects of the benefits package are underwhelming, the candidate can use those as reasons to ask for a higher salary to compensate.”

Instead, try something like :

I’m not comfortable sharing my current salary. I would prefer to focus on the value I can add to this company rather than what I’m paid at my current job. I don’t have a specific number in mind for a desired salary, and you know better than I do what value my skill set and experience could bring to your company. I want this move to be a big step forward for me in terms of both responsibility and compensation.

3. “Sorry”

According to Doody, “negotiating is uncomfortable, and our natural tendency is to try to smooth the edges on a difficult conversation. Saying sorry could signal to the recruiter or hiring manager that you might be willing to back down, and that could be expensive. Don’t apologize for negotiating.”

4. “No” and other negative words

“You want to continuously improve your situation throughout the negotiation and you do that by avoiding negative language and focusing on positive language. Instead of “No, that doesn’t work for me.” (two negative words) you can say, “I would be more comfortable with…” (positive words). Negative words slow things down and may put up walls that make collaboration difficult. Using only positive words is difficult at first, but you’ll get better with practice.”

5. “Yes”

While this may sound like the exact word to use when speaking to a recruiter, Doody insists it should be used with caution. “You’ll often get a job offer that seems really appealing, and it might be far more than you expected. Your instinct, in that case, might be to just accept the offer because it’s so good.”

But is it too good?

“It’s possible you underestimated your value in this situation. Instead of “Yes”, formulate a counter offer to see how much you can improve it. The negotiation should end with the company saying “Yes” to you. Once they say “Yes” to you, or you run out of things to ask for, then you are finished negotiating.”

6. “Later,” as in “I can deal with that after I start.”

Procrastinators, this one is for you. “Sometimes it’s easier to avoid uncomfortable parts of a negotiation by deferring those parts of the conversation until after you’re hired. That can be a very expensive mistake because you won’t have the same latitude to negotiate and improve your position once you’re in the door. Push through the discomfort and get the best possible result now,” Doody advises.

7. Try, as in “Can we try…?”

“Try is a passive word that leaves a lot of wiggle room, and you don’t want that,” insists Doody.  “It’s easy for someone to say — honestly or not — “We’ll try…” and reply with, “We tried and it just didn’t work out.” Don’t ask them to “try” to do something. Instead, use more positive language like “I would be more comfortable with.”

8. More, as in “I want more…”

While this word seems counter-intuitive because you are negotiating to get more, it’s a word that is too general for a successful negotiation. Instead of asking for “more” salary or “more” vacation, this is your time to get specific.

“Don’t leave things to the imagination once you’re negotiating. Instead of “Could you budge on the salary?”, say, ‘I would be more comfortable with a base salary of $105,000.’”

9. Want

Lastly, the word “want” can tank negotiations. Using it can undercut the entire premise of your argument that you deserve to be paid more and you deserve a more competitive salary. Go into a negotiation with facts and figures, making a compelling case. Start with printing out the results of your personal salary estimator, Know Your Worth. See what you base salary should be and see what the industry norms are.

“You could talk about what you want, which just isn’t all that important. Or you could talk about what the company wants, which is not as potent as talking about what the company needs, which are the most important thing,” adds Doody. “Focus on the company’s needs and how you can help meet those needs so they can easily see your value and work to compensate you for it.”

Read the original post here.

Visual and Mechanical Inspector (Dayton, OH)

BARRYSTAFF is looking for people to perform the visual and mechanical inspection of automotive parts. You will also be required to repack parts and label boxes. You will be expected to keep track of the good & bad parts.

You’ll be required to clean up around your workstation at the end of each shift. Travel to other job sites may be required. Overtime may also be required. Your supervisor will tell you when you are needed.

There are needs on all shifts:

1ST Shift: 6AM – 2:30PM

2nd Shift: 3PM – 11PM

3rd Shift: 10PM – 6AM

Dress: Jeans, plain t-shirt or sweat shirt and steel-toed shoes. Conservative and casual dress.

No shorts, capris, tank tops, or hats of any type allowed. Long hair must be pulled back.

About BARRYSTAFF:

The job search can be a pain. That’s why we’re here.

BARRYSTAFF has been putting people to work for over 30 years and remains the most successful locally-owned staffing agency in Dayton. With offices in Dayton, Piqua and Springfield, we specialize in industrial, clerical, and permanent placements. If you are looking for a new career, or if you are an employer looking for new talent, you are in the right place.

Welcome to BARRYSTAFF. Let’s go to work.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $11.00 /hour

Click here to apply via Indeed.com

You can also send your resume to a BARRYSTAFF recruiter at

recruiter@barrystaff.com

Machine Shop Laborer (Miamisburg, OH)

BARRYSTAFF is seeking candidates for a Miamisburg, OH machine shop. The shop provides fan shafts for heating, ventilating and air conditioning manufacturers. You will be trained to grind, deburr, run a horizontal mill or cut off machine, pack parts and do material handling.

Note: This is HEAVY, physical work. Must be able to lift up to 70 lbs.

Shift Hours: This is a 1st shift position from 6am to 4:30pm.

Dress: Jeans, T-shirts are fine. Must have leather work boots.

About BARRYSTAFF:

The job search can be a pain. That’s why we’re here.

BARRYSTAFF has been putting people to work for over 30 years and remains the most successful locally-owned staffing agency in Dayton. With offices in Dayton, Piqua and Springfield, we specialize in industrial, clerical, and permanent placements. If you are looking for a new career, or if you are an employer looking for new talent, you are in the right place.

Welcome to BARRYSTAFF. Let’s go to work.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $10.00 /hour

Click here to apply via Indeed.com

You can also email your resume to a BARRYSTAFF recruiter at

recruiter@barrystaff.com

Embroidery Machine Operator (Xenia, OH)

BARRYSTAFF is seeking two full-time embroidery machine operators to join up with a manufacturing facility in Xenia, OH. You will be producing custom Embroidery orders. Candidates must absolutely be detail oriented.

Previously embroidery experience is preferred but company is willing to train.

Shift: These are temp-to-hire 1st shift positions. The hours are 7am-4pm with a paid 30 minute lunch.

A pre-employment drug screen is required.

About BARRYSTAFF:

The job search can be a pain. That’s why we’re here.

BARRYSTAFF has been putting people to work for over 30 years and remains the most successful locally-owned staffing agency in Dayton. With offices in Dayton, Piqua and Springfield, we specialize in industrial, clerical, and permanent placements. If you are looking for a new career, or if you are an employer looking for new talent, you are in the right place.

Welcome to BARRYSTAFF. Let’s go to work.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $9.00 /hour

Click here to apply via Indeed.com

You can also email your resume to a BARRYSTAFF recruiter at

recruiter@barrystaff.com

CNC Operator (Springfield, OH)

BARRYSTAFF is looking for a CNC Machine Operator to work 3rd shift for a Springfield area company. Candidates must be able to read micrometers. Pay starts at between $12 and $14 per hour.

Hours are from 10 PM to 630 AM.

Must have at least 1 year of experience with a clean background.

About BARRYSTAFF:

The job search can be a pain. That’s why we’re here.

BARRYSTAFF has been putting people to work for over 30 years and remains the most successful locally-owned staffing agency in Dayton. With offices in Dayton, Piqua and Springfield, we specialize in industrial, clerical, and permanent placements. If you are looking for a new career, or if you are an employer looking for new talent, you are in the right place.

Welcome to BARRYSTAFF. Let’s go to work.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $12.00 to $14.00 /hour

Click here to apply via Indeed.com

You can also email your resume to a BARRYSTAFF recruiter at

recruiter@barrystaff.com

Cafeteria Worker for Educational Institution (Dayton, OH)

Barrystaff is currently seeking candidates for concession stand workers to help work different events locally in Dayton, OH.The position involves filling drinks, bagging popcorn, etc. Must have docker style pants and collared shirt, blouse, or polo or be able to get these.

Hours: These positions are part time hours and hours vary week to week.

Notes: Candidates must have a clean background. The location is on the bus line.

Please submit resume for immediate consideration.

About BARRYSTAFF:

The job search can be a pain. That’s why we’re here.

BARRYSTAFF has been putting people to work for over 30 years and remains the most successful locally-owned staffing agency in Dayton. With offices in Dayton, Piqua and Springfield, we specialize in industrial, clerical, and permanent placements. If you are looking for a new career, or if you are an employer looking for new talent, you are in the right place.

Welcome to BARRYSTAFF. Let’s go to work.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $10.00 /hour

Click here to apply via Indeed.com

You can also email your resume to a BARRYSTAFF recruiter at

recruiter@barrystaff.com

Arena Concessions Staff (Dayton, OH)

Barrystaff is currently seeking candidates for concession stand workers to help work different events locally in Dayton, OH.The position involves filling drinks, bagging popcorn, etc. Must have docker style pants and collared shirt, blouse, or polo or be able to get these.

Hours: These positions are part time hours and hours vary week to week.

Notes: Candidates must have a clean background. The location is on the bus line.

Please submit resume for immediate consideration.

About BARRYSTAFF:

The job search can be a pain. That’s why we’re here.

BARRYSTAFF has been putting people to work for over 30 years and remains the most successful locally-owned staffing agency in Dayton. With offices in Dayton, Piqua and Springfield, we specialize in industrial, clerical, and permanent placements. If you are looking for a new career, or if you are an employer looking for new talent, you are in the right place.

Welcome to BARRYSTAFF. Let’s go to work.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $11.00 /hour

Click here to apply via Indeed.com

You can also email your resume to a BARRYSTAFF recruiter at

recruiter@barrystaff.com

General Labor (Fairborn, OH)

BARRYSTAFF is seeking candidates to work for a heat exchanger manufacturer in the Fairborn, OH area.

What You’ll Do:

You will handle a variety of tasks within the facility to ensure heat exchangers are produced with the highest possible degree of professionalism and quality. Example applications for Heat Exchanger services and solutions are food & beverage, brewery (brewing), dairy, chemical, petroleum, hydrocarbon processing, pharmaceutical, mining, automotive, pulp & paper, power & marine.

What You’ll Need:

Pre-employment drug screen

Flexibility with your schedule

Ability to work both indoors and outdoors

Must be able to stand for 12-hour shifts

Math/measuring skills

Must know your tools

Must have steel-toe boots

Hours: 7am – 4:30pm

About BARRYSTAFF:

The job search can be a pain. That’s why we’re here.

BARRYSTAFF has been putting people to work for over 30 years and remains the most successful locally-owned staffing agency in Dayton. With offices in Dayton, Piqua and Springfield, we specialize in industrial, clerical, and permanent placements. If you are looking for a new career, or if you are an employer looking for new talent, you are in the right place.

Welcome to BARRYSTAFF. Let’s go to work.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $10.00 /hour

Click here to apply via Indeed.com

You can also email your resume to a BARRYSTAFF recruiter at

recruiter@barrystaff.com

From DBJ: 17,000 open jobs in Dayton region

This was originally published by the Dayton Business Journal on Oct. 30, 2018. Click here for the original link.

 

By DBJ Staff

For those seeking employment, the Dayton region is a fine place to be. That’s the word from the latest figures from the state of Ohio.

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services reports 16,800 job openings were posted in the 14-county Dayton and west Ohio regions from Aug. 14 to Sept. 13. This marks a jump of 190 jobs from the previous period, and a boost of 1,025 job adds from last year.

The data sheds light on the large number of open jobs and the companies and sectors seeking workers.

Topping the list was Kettering Medical Center with 900 job postings, followed by Lowe’s with 187 listings and Crown Equipment (176).

Other top job seekers included Dayton Children’s Hospital (175), Northrop Grumman (162) and Mercy Health (156).

(Note: The data comes from research via nonprofit The Conference Board and may not include all sources of data for open jobs.)

In terms of salary, 14 percent of these open positions pay less than $30,000 a year; 19 percent pay up to $50,000 a year; and 42 percent pay up to $80,000 a year. About 25 percent pay more than $80,000.

About 33 percent of the jobs posted require a GED or high school-level education; while 42 percent require an associate’s degree. Twenty-two percent require a bachelor’s degree, and about 4 percent require graduate education.