The terrible job advice parents give to their millennial kids

By Corinne Purtill

This article originally appear on Quartz at Work. Click here to read.

Parents: the advice you’re doling out on how to seek and secure a job is bad. It’s really bad. It’s outdated and counterproductive. If you love your adult offspring and would like to see them succeed, you must cease and desist immediately.

Alison Green, a consultant who writes the popular blog Ask a Manager, has heard cringingly bad stories from adult children of misguided (but well-intentioned!) parents who don’t realize that some tactics that worked decades ago are likely to backfire now. Quartz At Work talked with Green to learn the most common pieces of advice that job seekers can (and should) ignore.

Regarding that resume

Parent says: You know what you should do? Get some nice paper, print out your resume, and have it sent overnight. Or just go in there and hand it to the boss yourself!

Green says: “It used to be an impressive move, but it’s no longer true that you should “pound the pavement” and show up in person to apply for jobs.

“First, nearly all applications are electronic these days. Many employers have no easy way to get hard copy materials (resume and cover letter) into their electronic application processing systems; they’d have to scan them in, and they don’t want to do that for you. They want you to apply online using their system there. So showing up to hand someone your resume comes across as out of touch. (There are some exceptions to this, like restaurants, but for the most part this is all done online these days.)

“Second, job openings on average get far more applicants these days than they used to. That’s probably a function of how much easier it to apply for jobs online now that you don’t have to mail out resumes individually. And since employers are fielding hundreds of applicants for each position, they really don’t want to deal with random applicants showing up in person and expecting to talk to someone; it would end up being hugely time-consuming. Employers have a system for screening applications, and they don’t want you to circumvent it.”

Following up

Parent says: Did you call to follow up? Well, call them again!

Green says: “This idea that you should show “gumption” to impress a hiring manager—things like call every few days to ask about your application or try to buy the hiring manager coffee—that stuff doesn’t work. To the contrary, it alienates most hiring managers—and it can be really frustrating to be on the receiving end of that advice from insistent parents.”

Carving a path

Parent says: You’re making how much? As an assistant? Don’t you know how many loans you have?

Green says: “There’s a particular misunderstanding these days of how hard it can be for newer grads to find work in their field, and how so often you have to start at the bottom and work your way in however you can. Parents see their kids doing low-paying entry-level jobs and because they don’t realize that will eventually lead to much better positions in the field the kid wants to work in, they sometimes panic and try to push them in a totally different direction.

“I also hear about a lot of parents doing a hard-sell on grad school, figuring that the kid will come out significantly more marketable—and not realizing that in a lot of cases, grad school will make the job search harder, if the field the kid is in doesn’t place particular value on graduate degrees.”

So then what?

Parent says: Fine, I’ll butt out. But what’s your plan?

Green says: “Really, the best way to show enthusiasm and fit for a job is by having a resume that shows a track record of achievement in things relevant to what the employer is looking for, and writing a personalized, engaging cover letter that truly speaks to why you’d excel at the job (i.e., not one that just repeats the contents of your resume). It’s a boring answer, but it’s really the one that works the best, at least with good employers.”

Hear an employee talk about how BARRYSTAFF set him up for success

When David came to see us, he made no bones about the importance of landing a job.

“It’s very important,” he said. “Bills cost money. Without money, you don’t live.

“I’ve got to live,” he said.

Click on the video to hear how BARRYSTAFF took the necessary steps to set him up for success.

5 things you definitely don’t want to do during your job search in 2018

We came across this article on theladders.com. It’s insightful.

By Jane Burnet

With the new year come plenty of opportunities to get your job search right.

This is what you shouldn’t do during your job search in 2018.

Allude to your age

Don’t give anyone a reason to doubt your skills.

Peter Economy, a ghostwriter and author, writes in Inc. that you should not include “age identifiers” on your resume or LinkedIn page.

“Don’t list those positions you had a long time ago, and leave off graduation dates,” he writes. “Age discrimination does exist, and you at least want to get your foot in the door for an interview so they can see how awesome you are at creating age-irrelevance.”

Fail to be your own champion

Marcello Barros, author of The International Advantage: Get Noticed. Get Hired!, writes about this in The Muse.

“Some people spend precious emotional energy assuring themselves that the hunt is taking as long as it is because they simply aren’t good enough,” he writes. “And when you stop believing in yourself, you’re in trouble. Don’t rush into a decision like taking a position you feel uneasy about or heading back to school simply out of fear. Instead remind yourself of all the reasons you might not be getting a call back that have nothing to do with you (like if you’ve been applying to roles you truly aren’t qualified for).”

Be too narrow in your job search

You may not even realize that you’re limiting your options.

A FlexJobs post says that “job searching only by job title” is not the way to go.

“While you may identify with a specific title, each employer can have a different title for the same job duties. When you focus only on job titles, you narrow your search too closely and may miss opportunities that would be a perfect match for your experience. Instead of focusing on the job title, consider searching by industry and desired flexibility. You can also use keywords or search by company,” it says.

Fail to do your homework

You’ll want to know as much as possible.

Lillian Childress writes on Glassdoor that “skipping your research” is not a good idea.

“A well-informed candidate is always preferable to the alternative. Asking questions about your specific interests in the company, and even just asking general questions about what the company does, are some of the most common interview questions out there. If you haven’t done your research, it’s ultimately a waste — not only of the recruiter’s time, but also of your own,” she writes.

Not get back in touch after an interview

Alison Doyle, a career expert, author, and founder and CEO of CareerToolBelt.com, writes in The Balance that you shouldn’t be “forgetting to follow up.”

“Following up after a job interview gives you one more chance to make a good impression,” she writes. “People like to be appreciated and a quick thank you note, email or phone call is a good way to show you appreciate the time and the opportunity. Following up also gives you a chance to mention anything you wish you had said during the interview.”