BARRYSTAFF December Newsletter

We recently came across this piece published by Forbes and thought you might enjoy it. Just in time for the holiday season.
What 7 Of The Best Business Books Of 2017 Taught Us This Year
This year, our shelves were packed with books profiling the personal and enterprise effects of globalization in the new economy. Covering topics as wide as how to improve workplace resiliency through improv comedy to reimagining corporate hiring strategies to leverage the gig economy, seven of my favorites lent sharp new insight into the direction of the labor market and enterprise’s response to it.
Here are my seven favorite books this year and what you can learn from each:
1. Embracing the freelancer has never been easier—or, more critical to thriving in the gig economy.
Back in early October, Rob Biederman and Patrick Petitti, co-CEOs of Catalant Technologies, released their first book, entitled Reimagining Work: Strategies to Disrupt Talent, Lead Change, and Win with a Flexible Workforce. An exploration of the gig economy, the book takes a deep dive in the successes and failures of this talent management consulting company. The book provides salient insight into the changes happening within the talent acquisition industry and speaks to both the hearts of the autonomous freelancer and the hiring manager looking to create a flexible hiring culture at their organization. The main takeaway: As the workforce grows increasingly international, the future of work lies in the hands of those enterprises that prioritize flexibility in their hiring strategies.
2. “Yes, and …” can make your workplace more resilient.
Bob Kulhan, founder of Business Improv, is as much a master improviser as he is a skilled businessman and his book, Getting to “Yes And”: The Art of Business Improv, makes for a colorful and insightful read into the dynamics of improving workforce resiliency. Based on Kulhan’s decades of experience teaching the tenets improv to business leaders, the book explains how acceptance and adaptability — two of the main tenets of improv — are essential to ensuring smoothness of day-to-day functioning within an organization and its teams. Teaching momentary situational analysis, snap decision making and workplace camaraderie makes this book an excellent read for any manager looking to build a great team.
3. How you change your business is just as important as what you change in your business.
Business leaders and academic authors, Carsten Linz, Günter Müller-Stevens
and Alexander Zimmerman, categorize business model transformations through a rich series of corporate examples in their book, Radical Business Model Transformation: Gaining the Competitive Edge in a Disruptive World. For as many business models exist, there is an equal number of leaders touting their strategy as the “the way forward.” This book makes the argument that in a rapidly globalizing and changing market, the best business strategy is not one static “ideal,” but an incrementally and perpetually flowing series of criteria to be met. The wise business is the one that is aware of the need to change the way they think about strategy and does so continually. The self-reflexivity of the lessons in this book provides an excellent roadmap to monitoring the progress your business model.
4. Take a bird’s-eye view of modern economics. 
Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st Century Economist is Kate Raworth’s magnum opus. A refreshing take on the ecology of modern economics,Doughnut Economics examines the space between biological and planetary limitations and the minimum resources required to sustain human life — the aforementioned “hole” of the doughnut. Raworth makes a compelling call to “[meet] the needs of all within the means of the planet” during the 21st century, and she creates a complex economic argument for the type of ecological mindset that would bring us into fair shooting distance of achieving that goal. This book serves as a fascinating reminder to business leaders and economists alike to stand back at a distance to examine our modern economics.
5. Human instinct may underpin market mechanics.
Financial economist Andrew Lo has released a monumental book that tips the fundamental assumptions of the efficient markets hypothesis on their heads in Adaptive Markets: Financial Evolution at the Speed of Thought. Unlike the other books on this list, this book questions our very understanding of market behavior and, thereby, our understanding of business models that stem from the efficient markets hypothesis. This book packs a heavy punch with its cogency and erudition, and Lo makes quick work of constructing a conceptual narrative around the theory of adaptive markets: markets that do not incorporate all available information but are rather based on human instinct and decision making.
6. Workplace culture curation is beginning to fall under the purview of the CEO.
Perhaps the most personal and affecting selection of this book list is Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella’s new book on changing Microsoft’s culture, entitled Hit Refresh: The Quest to Rediscover Microsoft’s Soul and Imagine a Better Future for Everyone. Powerful in its thoughtfulness and humanity, this book reflects Nadella’s personal journey through his tenure at Microsoft, his reticence in accepting the title of CEO and the subsequent corporate changes he has instituted while at the helm of this tech juggernaut. Bringing inclusivity and diversity to the top of Microsoft’s priority list has shifted the tide of day-to-day functioning within the company, and this book details just how these top-down cultural reprioritization shifts have affected Microsoft’s employees. The book brings together the high-minded rhetoric of the C-level executive and the daily concerns of the worker.
7. Owning one’s job is now a thing of the future, not the past. 
Today’s workforce is mobile, the economy is dynamic and the idea that an employee is devoted to one job or one company is a thing of the past. In Matt Dahlstrom’s Bloom, he gives us the tools to build an organization of Owners, not Renters and walks us through what employees need to ensure our best employees stay connected to the company and feel inspired. Dahlstrom’s book acts as both a reference to create a new work culture and a guide that helps us identify our company needs in order to establish a team that is committed, motivated and substantially more enthusiastic to their work and the organization.
Christmas Time at BARRYSTAFF
Click the video below to see what owner Pam Barry has done with the place.
BARRYSTAFF - Decorating for Christmas
You can never have too many Christmas trees in the office. Click to see how we decorated.
Acknowledgements
Random Business Fact: The Asia Tiger Funds’ stock symbol is GRR.

If You’re Sick, Stay Away From Work. If You Can’t, Here Is What Doctors Advise.

BY

The New York Times

When Elle Fraser, a business operations assistant for the New Jersey Devils, came down with the flu just before Thanksgiving last year, she didn’t think about staying home from work.

The hockey team had home games on Wednesday and Friday that week, and she worried that her work would never get done without her, even if she had a 103-degree fever.

She toughed it out, alternating between chills and sweats, falling asleep at her desk, wiping down every surface she touched, and insisting to co-workers she was wearing mittens to handle tickets only because she was cold.

On that Wednesday, Ms. Fraser, 23, worked from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. On Thanksgiving Day, she slept most of the day. The next day, she went back to work, just as sick as she was on Wednesday.

Sure, she technically had a choice to use a sick day and stay home, but that was not how she saw it. She thought she didn’t really have a choice.

“Nobody tries to convince you to go home because they knew in that situation they’d be doing the same thing,” she said.

Some people might read her account as a tribute to hard work and selflessness. Others might be aghast that she had risked exposing others to illness.

It’s clear on which side doctors come down: They say workers with the flu or a cold should use sick days far more often than they do. Though millions of Americans don’t get paid time off when they’re sick, those who do have the option often don’t take it.

“If it’s bad enough that you’re wondering if you should stay home, you should probably stay home,” said Dr. Pritish K. Tosh, an infectious diseases researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

When, and how long, should you stay home?

Remember: It’s not just about you.

Even if you can battle the flu by enduring a miserable week, it can be deadly for others, especially pregnant women, young children and older people. And no matter how many precautions you take, there’s no way to eliminate risk to people around you.

As a general rule, Dr. Tosh suggested people stay home until they are fever-free for 24 hours. He said he stayed out of work for three or four days the last time he had the flu.

“People can be infectious even before they start to have symptoms, but most of the time that they’re going to be most infectious is going to be when they are sickest, especially if they’re having fevers,” he said.

Infectious germs are spread most frequently by airborne “respiratory droplets” from sneezing and coughing. The flu virus can last for up to 24 hours depending on the surface, Dr. Tosh said.

By coughing or sneezing into your hands, or wiping a runny nose, your hands can spread the germs to everything you touch — including surfaces many other people touch, such as door knobs, elevator buttons or shopping carts.

“You’re never truly not contagious until all of those symptoms are resolved,” said Dr. David Shih, executive vice president of strategy, health and innovation at CityMD, which runs a chain of urgent care centers in New Jersey, New York and Washington.

How can you limit the exposure to others?

Let’s say you’re ignoring the doctors and going out into the world anyway.

You’re not alone: A CityMD survey in August found that 69 percent of Americans with the flu or flulike symptoms said they went to the drugstore or a pharmacy, 43 percent said they went to the grocery store and 39 percent said they went to work. Millennials (76 percent) were far more likely than those 35 or older (56 percent) to have left the house the last time they were sick.

Though you can’t eliminate the risk of infecting others, there are steps you can take to minimize it:

• Get in the habit of coughing and sneezing into your elbow, not your hand. Children are being taught to cough like Dracula.

• Limit your interaction with other people as much as possible. If you’re going to work, consider skipping nonessential meetings.

• Avoid physical contact with other people, especially shaking hands.

• Wipe surfaces down after touching them.

• Use hand sanitizer or wash your hands after coughing or sneezing.

• Wear a mask to limit the respiratory droplets.

• Take medication to reduce your symptoms.

Oh, by the way, get your flu shot.

What about people who don’t have sick days?

Stay-at-home parents scoff at the idea of sick days, as do millions of other workers whose jobs don’t offer paid time off.

“For people who are living paycheck to paycheck or have significant debt, the risks of staying home and losing pay or potentially losing their job are far too great,” said Vicki Shabo, vice president for workplace policies and strategies at the National Partnership for Women and Families.

Low-income earners and part-time workers are especially likely to work while sick, including those at restaurants and hospitals. Ms. Shabo and advocates like her are pushing for laws mandating paid sick days, which are in place or will be soon in eight states, 30 cities and two counties.

“It’s important from a public health perspective, and a workplace morale perspective, that people can take the time they need to recover,” she said.

Click here to read the original article.

This is the scariest job interview question — and how to answer it

By Anita Hamilton

Mic.com

There’s nothing quite like the spine-tingling jolt of getting called in for a job interview after weeks of sending out your resume, crossing your fingers and mostly getting a bunch of canned emails thanking you for submitting your application in response. But that initial excitement can quickly turn to anxiety if you’re not prepared once you finally walk in the door.

As it turns out, interviewing in person is the most intimidating part of the job search process, according to a survey of 570 undergraduates and recent college grads by career site WayUp. The fear factor doesn’t end there either.

Once you sit down face-to-face with your interviewer, what’s the “scariest” question you could get asked? For nearly 41% of current undergraduates and 35% of recent grads who replied to the online survey conducted in October, it was: “Out of all the other candidates, why should we hire you?”

That question beat out four other choices, including, “What are your biggest strengths and weaknesses?” and “Where do you see yourself in five years?”

Students and recent grads alike said they were most intimidated by by being put on the spot about why an employer should hire them in particular.Source: WayUp/WayUp

 

How to answer the toughest question

“Basically the entire interview boils down to this question,” Vicki Salemi, a career expert at Monster, said in a phone interview. Thankfully, making a case for why you’re the best fit for the job isn’t all that hard — so long as you’ve got your answer figured out in advance. “You need to be convincing and honest, but also have your talking points ready to go,” she added.

The best kind of answer achieves two goals: It demonstrates what you bring to the job, and it conveys your respect for and understanding of their business. The more precisely you can quantify your answers the better.

Here are a couple of sample answers you might give:

“Your company is a leader in industry X, and that is an area I excel in as well, as you can see from the fact that I have been the top sales person on a 10-person team also doing X for the last two years.”

“I’m a great fit for this position because it requires excellent project management skills, and I led the rollout of products X, Y and Z at my last job, which boosted revenue by 30% over the last year.”

If you’re new to the job market and don’t have hard numbers to quantify your skills, you can go with a softer approach, such as:

“You mentioned that attention to detail is a key aspect of this job. In my last job [or internship] at company Y, I got top marks for this in my reviews by doing A, B and C, which saved the company both time and money.”

And if the interviewer asks you about a skill you don’t have, you can get around that by using an example that shows you are a self-starter:

“I haven’t done that before, but I’m a quick learner. For example, in my last job at company Y, I learned the billing system in 2 days, compared to the full week it typically took new hires.”

The key here is to “know your unique value proposition,” which should be tailored to the job and the company, career expert Heather Huhman said: “If you don’t know it, you’re never going to be able to sell yourself to an employer.”

Click here to read the original article.