Please Don’t Do These 9 Things In An Interview

Looking for a job can be stressful and demoralizing.  I’d really like for you to succeed: it would be good for you, for the company that hires you, and for the overall economy.  In fact, I want you to get the best job you possibly can – one that you enjoy, and that challenges you and makes best use of your strengths.

In the service of that, there are some actions I want to steer you away from when you’re doing a job interview, things that – trust me – will not create the impression you want to create. Of course, some approaches are a matter of taste and style –  certain interviewers will like them while others won’t – but there are also ways of behaving that are pretty universally not a good idea. And, unfortunately, interviewees often get counseled to do some version of these things. So, having interviewed a great many people over the course of my career, and having spoken to hundreds of hiring managers about what they’ve liked and haven’t liked in those they’ve interviewed, here you go. If you want an interview to go well, don’t:

1. Freeze up – A few years ago, I interviewed a woman for an administrative position with our company.  Her resume looked excellent and appropriate, and she had been articulate, though very quiet, on the phone.  When we were actually sitting in a room together, though, she more or less disappeared: wouldn’t look at me; gave monosyllabic answers in a frightened mumble; seemed terrified when I asked her to tell me why she wanted to work for our company. If you can’t make it through an interview without crumbling, people are unlikely to believe you’ll be able to withstand the rigors of a normal job.  So if you find interviews particularly daunting, work on your self-talk beforehand. For example, if you find you’re saying things to yourself like, “I’m terrible in interviews, I know I’ll look like an idiot” – that can be a self-fulfilling prophecy.  Instead, change your mental monologue to something more hopeful, yet still realistic, like “I get nervous during interviews, so I need to practice beforehand, and remember to look at the interviewer and keep breathing.” And do practice, too – that can really reduce your fear of the unknown.

2. Dominate – Then there’s  the opposite behavior. I was once interviewing a woman who swept into the room, flashed me a blinding smile, shook my hand as though it were a pump handle, sat down and just started talking.  The quality of what she said was actually good – she’d done her homework about our company, and had great insights into what the job might require. But there was no space for anything but her monologue – I wasn’t able to ask her a single question.  It was exhausting, and certainly not something I would have wanted to experience every day.  If you know you have a strong personality and tend to talk a lot, coach yourself before you go into an interview to get curious about the interviewer: what he or she might be interested in hearing from you, his or her view of the job and of the company.  If you’re in a curious mindset, you’ll be much more likely to listen, and the interview will be a dialogue, vs. a monologue.

3. Be sloppy – Some companies are very casual – people come to work in tee shirts and jeans – while others still have rigorous dress codes (someone told me yesterday that female employees at the Ritz-Carlton are still expected to wear hose every day).  Try to find out, before your interview, what’s standard dress at that particular company.  But no matter how casual the dress code – don’t be a slob. Having good personal hygiene – clean hair, showered, nails trimmed – and clean, unwrinkled clothing is much more  important than whether you’re a little over-dressed or under-dressed. When someone comes to an interview looking like he or she has just rolled out of bed, it communicates lack of respect for the interviewer, the job and the company.

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American manufacturers are looking forward to a big comeback once the election is over

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US manufacturers had a strong start to the fourth quarter and are looking forward to the end of the presidential election, according to Markit Economics’ preliminary report on the sector for October.

The flash purchasing manager’s index (PMI) rose to 53.2, Markit said on Monday. The index is based on a survey of manufacturers, and the “flash” reading is based on 85% to 90% of all responses collected every month.

Economists had predicted that the PMI was unchanged at 51.5, according to Bloomberg. A reading above 50 indicates that the sector is still in expansion.

“Both output and new orders are rising at the fastest rates for a year amid increasingly widespread optimism that demand will pick up again after the presidential election, which has been commonly cited as a key factor that has subdued spending and investment in recent months,” said Chris Williamson, chief business economist at IHS Markit, in the data release.

Manufacturing production increased for a fifth straight month, and new export orders improved from September. The rise in unfinished work due to backlogs was the most in a year. Also, companies said there was more capacity pressures at their plants, partly because they had slowed the pace of hiring.

The manufacturing sector has not yet fully recovered since the dollar’s rise and weak global economic conditions crushed demand for US goods last year.

In September, the PMI rebounded from a contractionary reading of 49.4 — the first slip into that territory since February. Some respondents to Markit’s survey reported a rise in domestic and international sales, with some customers buying ahead of anticipated price increases.

Manufacturing has been a hot button topic in the presidential campaign. Republican nominee Donald Trump has repeatedly said the US does not make things anymore, and has vowed to bring back manufacturing jobs from Mexico and China.

It’s worth noting that manufacturing now makes a much smaller contribution to the US economy compared to the services sector, where two-thirds of all activity takes place.

This piece was originally posted by Business Insider.

12 Surprising Job Interview Tips

You’re almost there. Your resume landed you an interview and now it’s time to seal the deal. So what’s the best way to prepare?

To find the answer, I looked back on my interviews, sifted through research, and most importantly, asked employees from today’s most coveted companies. I tried to find deep insights beyond the typical “sit up straight!” and “dress to impress!” tips we hear too much.

Below you’ll find the 12 best tips to help before, during and after your interview.job-interview-ease-nerves

BEFORE

 1.    Research Earnings Calls, Quarterly Reports & Blog Posts

In today’s world, content is king. Goldman Sachs publishes quarterly reports, Microsoft records its earning calls, and every startup has a blog.

With so much out there, I’m baffled that few of us look past the company’s homepage. It’s like we’re writing an essay on The Odyssey without quoting a single passage from the book.

Example: If you’re interviewing with Google, here’s two ways to answer: “What’s Google’s biggest opportunity in the next 5 years?”

  • Weak: “I think wearable technology will be big because Google Glass and Apple Watch represent a new trend that shows…”
  • Strong: “Call me geeky, but I was listening to Google’s quarterly earnings call and was blown away by the fact that display advertising hit over $5 billion in the past few years. Therefore, I think that…”

Neither answer is wrong, but the latter says much more. It shows you’ve done your homework and give answers rooted in data.

2.   Use Google Alerts

Keeping up with company news is hard, especially if you’re interviewing with multiple places at once. That’s why Google Alerts is a savior; it’s a tool that emails you anytime a new story appears for a specific term. That way, you learn about current events without searching for them.

 Example: If you’re applying to Creative Artists Agency, follow these steps:

  1. Go to www.google.com/alerts
  2. Type in “Creative Artists Agency”
  3. Put in your email address if you’re not already logged in to Gmail

Soon enough, you’ll get updates on CAA and have more ammo for your interview.

3. Use Social Sweepster To Clean Your Facebook & Twitter

Nowadays, 91% of employers search your social media for any red flags. While most people tell you to watch every single thing you upload, there’s a much easier solution. Use Social Sweepster, an app that detects pictures of red solo cups, beer bottles, and other “suspicious” objects. It even detects profanity from your past posts! Now, that’s f%$king awesome!

“Too many recruiters reject candidate because of something they found on their social platforms” Social Sweepster CEO Tom McGrath says. “We help you create the first impression on your own terms.”

4. Schedule For Tuesday at 10:30 AM

According to Glassdoor, the best time to interview is 10:30 AM on Tuesday. Remember, your interviewer has a world of responsibilities beyond hiring. They’re responding to emails, balancing projects, and meeting tons of other candidates so it’s crucial to consider when they’ll be in the best mental state to meet you.

10:30 AM Tuesday is the sweet spot because you:

  • Avoid the bookends. On Mondays and Fridays, employees gear up for the week or wind down. By the same token, avoid the first or last slots of any workday.
  • Avoid lunchtime. Immediately before noon, your interviewer may be too hungry to concentrate; immediately after, they may be in a food coma.

But there’s a caveat. Research shows it’s best to take the earliest interview slot “in circumstances under which decisions must be made quickly or without much deliberation because preferences are unconsciously and immediately guided to those options presented first.”

Bottom line: if the firm is hiring for a job starting in a few months, try to interview late morning between Tuesday through Thursday. If the firm is hiring immediately, grab the earliest slot.

5. Craft Your “Story Statement”

 Though most interviews start with the same prompt (“tell me about yourself” or “walk me through your resume”), we blow it off with boring answers like:

I studied [major X] because I really care about making a difference in [industry Y] as you can see through my last job at [company Z]…

This answer is like tearing out the first 200 pages of your autobiography. You leave out everything that gives meaning to why you want this job in the first place. What was your moment of epiphany? How did your childhood influence you? Why does this job move you? Most people don’t answer these questions. They start and end with their professional experience, leaving little to inspire the interviewer.

Next time, use what I call a “Story Statement,” which is a Cliff Notes of your autobiography.

Example: Here’s an amazing Story Statement that Teach For America fellow Kareli Lizarraga used for her interviews.

I grew up in California and Arizona after immigrating to the United States when I was four years old. Since neither of my parents went to college, I relied on my high school teachers to help me apply to top universities. With their support, I was able to attend the University of Pennsylvania. Then I spent a summer at a Washington DC law firm, which represented low-income students and helped me realize that my passion lay within creating educational opportunities for all.

I decided to become a teacher because I see myself so deeply reflected in the stories of so many students in your schools – and that’s why I’m so excited about the opportunity to interview with you today. Like my teachers did for me, I want to impact the next generation of students by supporting them and understanding the experiences they’re facing.

A Story Statement shows that you’re a person, not just a professional.  It also makes it easy for your interviewer to predict the next chapter of your story. For Kareli, Teach For America is a logical next step. Of course, if she interviewed for Apple, she may change her Story Statement to include an early experience with her first computer and talk about how her passion for tech grew from there. For a Bain interview, she could mention how she started problem solving at a young age and now wants to do it on a big scale.

Chances are, we’ve all had experiences we can connect to where we’re trying to go. It’s just a matter of selecting the right ones to tell our story. That said, if you struggle to craft your Story Statement for a particular interview, you might be applying for the wrong job.

6. Wear a Subtle Fashion Statement

We already know dressing well makes a difference. But what if we took our attention to detail a step further? That’s exactly what Morgan Stanley analyst Julio German Arias Castillo did for his interviews.

“Wear something that represents your culture or background,” he says. “In my case, I always wear a pin of the Panamanian flag on my suit lapel. Most of my interviewers ask about it so it becomes a chance to discuss my upbringing and love of my homeland.”

Julio created a conversation starter with his clothing. Depending on the company, you can be more playful: wear a bracelet from your recent travels to India, a tie with a quirky pattern, or — if you can pull it off — a small mockingjay pin if you’re a Hunger Games fan. As long as it’s subtle and tasteful, your fashion statement can build rapport through fun conversations about your hometown or mutual love for Katniss Everdeen.job-interview-tips-infographic-every-vowel-1216x1940

7. Prepare for The “What’s Your Weakness?” Question

 Most people overthink this question and give a canned answer like “I’m too much of a perfectionist!” Others give a genuine answer but still fall short of what this question is really asking. It’s not about admitting your weaknesses. It’s about showing how you overcome them. What systems have you put in place? What progress have you made? Include those thoughts to strengthen your answer.

Example:

  • Weak: “My weakness is that I struggle to run efficient meetings…”
  • Strong: “I sometimes struggle to run efficient meetings. But I’ve worked to improve by drafting an agenda before every meeting, sending it to all participants, and then following up with a recap and clear action items so everyone knows what to do moving forward.”

8. Brainstorm 3 “PAR” Anecdotes

Your interview is as memorable as the stories you share. Many people have fascinating experiences but forget them when they’re on the spot.  To remedy this, have three anecdotes ready to plug into your interview. Your anecdotes should follow a simple format:

  1. Problem – what was the situation?
  2. Action – what did you do to solve it?
  3. Result – what changed afterwards?

With this format, you can adapt your PAR anecdotes to fit a variety of questions such as “tell me about a time you worked with a team” or “when have you struggled most?”

Example: University of Pennsylvania Senior Hunter Horsley has a terrific PAR anecdote for his interviews.

  • Problem: “When I worked on Lore, an education tech startup, our big marketing challenge was finding a way to get professors to try our product. Ads are inefficient and competitors like Blackboard and Canvas had sales teams call IT administrators to sign multi-year contracts — a very slow and expensive process. We needed to move faster.”
  • Action: ”We realized that students preferred our product so we teamed up with about 200 students from 100 colleges. They developed a custom outreach plan for their campus and we provided resources to support them.”
  • Result: “This was highly effective in creating awareness with professors. In fact, it became a competitive advantage. During our first two semesters, our team of 15 people drove adoption that outpaced a competing product launched by Pearson at the same time. An additional benefit was that the approach created brand affinity. Because professors heard about the tool from students instead of an ad, the value proposition came across more authentically.”

nervous-before-interview

DURING

9.    Think Aloud on Analytical Questions

Some interviews include tough analytical questions. Whether you’re solving for an exact number (“what’s the EBITDA of Company X?”) or rough estimate (“how many ping pong balls can fit in a Boeing 777?”), it’s important to talk through your thinking. Don’t just give an answer; show how you got there.

Example: Consider these two answers to “How many lawn mowers are there today in the United States?”

  • Weak: After 45 seconds of silence, you blurt out “75 million!”
  • Strong: You’re talking the entire way through, sharing your calculations and assumptions.

“Let’s start from the top down. Assuming the US population is 300 million and each household averages 3 people, then we have 100 million families in the US. Let’s assume urban households don’t have lawns to mow and therefore only suburban and rural families buy lawnmowers. If roughly 25% of America is urban and 75% is suburban and rural then we have 75 million households that own a lawnmower.”

(side note: it’s okay to make assumptions and for those assumptions to be off. But that’s why you need to communicate them first).

This is a great way to show your communication skills alongside your analytical ones. Plus, if you make an error, it’s easier to know where you went wrong and fix it.

10. Ask Questions That Kill Two Birds With One Stone

At the end of your interview, it’ll be your turn to ask a few questions. This is a perfect opportunity to kill two birds with one stone – that is, asking a genuine question while conveying something new about you. Most people just do the first part and forgo a final chance to impress the interviewer.

Example:

  • Weak: Will this role provide opportunities to work in emerging markets?
  • Strong: I’m passionate about languages and minored in Arabic in college. Will this role provide opportunities to work in emerging markets in the Middle East?
  • Weak: Are there opportunities for community service?
  • Strong: I used to work with Habitat for Humanity and was so grateful for the opportunity to give back. For a full time employee, are there company-wide community service events that I could take part in?
  • Weak: What’s [Company X]’s fastest growing division?
  • Strong: According to your quarterly report, your revenues grew by 17%. Is that because of a particular division within the company?

This works beautifully if you haven’t found a natural way to bring up an accomplishment or cite a publication beforehand.

11. Grow A Backbone & Ask This Final Question

This one takes guts — and that’s why I love it. Spredfast Product Manager Luke Fernandez says it’s the “single piece of advice that has consistently made a difference.”

Before your interview ends, ask this one last question: “Have I said anything in this interview or given you any other reason to doubt that I am a good fit for the role?”

“It’s bold, but if delivered honestly, it displays true desire and confidence,” Luke said. “I’ve been commended for that specific question in interviews with Google, YouTube, BCG, Deloitte, Twitter, and Spredfast. In one situation, the interviewer actually said yes and gave me the chance to clarify something that would have otherwise lost me an offer.”

Talk about badass!

AFTER

12. Email a Personalized Thank You Note

Thank your interviewer within 24 hours of finishing. It not only shows your gratitude, it also combats recency bias if you interviewed early. Not to mention, it opens the door for dialogue even if you don’t get the job. Sometimes, recruiters reach back out on the same email thread months later, mentioning new job opportunities.

 Example: Accenture senior analyst Anthony Scafidi shared a wonderful email from Robert Hsu, an interviewee whose follow up email shows how to do it right.

Hi Anthony,

Appreciate your taking the time to chat with me today. I really enjoyed hearing about your two projects so far, how much you love the people at Accenture, and how you’ve been able to continue your community service work even while working. (Hope you had a good meeting with your mentee!) Best wishes on your current project.

Sincerely,

Robert

This piece was originally published by Forbes.

28 signs you’re a good boss — even if it doesn’t feel like it

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How can you tell if you’re a good boss?

You can’t just go out into the office and ask your employees. If you’re terrible, they have a vested interest in not telling you the truth.

You’re going to have to do some serious introspection and reflection to find out, either way. With that in mind, here are some subtle signs that you’re an excellent leader:

1. You’re willing to try new things

Good bosses adopt certain methods because they’re the best way of doing things — not because they’ve just fallen into certain habits. The best managers give their employees a little room to experiment and innovate.

2. You treat your employees like human beings

Unfortunately, some bosses seem to feel that hurling insults and abuse at people is an effective motivational technique. In most cases, this simply isn’t true. If you value your employees as human beings, then you’re already a huge step above many managers.

3. You don’t have obvious favorites

Playing favorites is a great way to torpedo office morale. If you make it clear that a certain person is the apple of your eye no matter what, then that’ll just encourage your other employees to give up on trying to impress you.

4. You hold everyone accountable …

Maintaining accountability is a big part of office morale and encourages workers to act with integrity, leading to an excellent workplace culture.

5. … including yourself

Good bosses don’t pick a scapegoat or explain away mistakes. In fact, experienced managers admit it when they fail in order to create a workplace that’s a safe environment for experimentation.

6. You ask politely

Insecure bosses bark out orders and behave like divas in order to establish their dominance. If you always say the magic word and are generally polite, then that’s definitely a good sign.

7. You give support

Bosses should build trust with their employees by providing a reasonable amount of support and guidance. Obviously, you don’t need to hold anyone’s hand, but throwing people into the deep end isn’t ideal, either.

8. You remove obstacles

Bad bosses throw up roadblocks that make it harder for people to succeed and do their jobs. Great managers should actively work to make the lives of their employees easier.

9. You’re a good coach

Coaches don’t just sit back on the sidelines twiddling their thumbs. They don’t run onto the field and start playing, either — unless they’re that one scary dad that takes the youth recreational soccer league way too seriously.

Good bosses are like good coaches: They command respect and provide the right blend of praise and constructive criticism to bring out the best in their employees.

10. You’re able to manage expectations

Bad bosses often disappoint or confuse their teams by presenting inaccurate pictures about how things are at the office — e.g., talking up how well the company’s doing and then springing news of layoffs on everyone. Good managers are honest and open.

11. You give feedback

Good employees crave feedback to learn how they can improve and grow. Great bosses are happy to oblige.

12. You keep the environment open and transparent

Transparency makes for a happy office culture.

13. You ask for insight

Employees want to feel heard.

Obviously, at the end of the day, you’re responsible for making the final judgment. But once in a while, if the situation calls for it, good bosses reach out to their workers to get their insights and opinions.

14. You explain yourself

Good managers don’t expect anyone to read their minds. They outline a clear vision and provide their team with the knowledge and tools to achieve it.

15. You care about solutions

When the going gets tough, the weak bosses find someone to blame. Good managers focus on finding a solution to the problem, rather than throwing people under the bus.

16. You want to challenge your employees

Bored workers are unhappy workers. The best bosses check in with their workers to ensure that they’re being challenged.

17. You don’t micromanage, but you’re not too hands-off

Carefully examine the capabilities of your workers in order to achieve a good balance. Could you give any of them more responsibilities? Is there anything you can start delegating?

18. You check in with your employees

You don’t pop in to nag people like Bill Lumbergh in “Office Space.” You genuinely check in to talk to — not at — your employees in order to find out their goals and worries.

19. You have a sense of humor

It’s important to never take the joking too far in the office. That being said, good bosses take their work seriously — not themselves. It’s good to have a laugh with your employees.

20. You care about the dreams and goals of your employees

The best bosses are invested in their employees. That means that they’re actively concerned with the professional goals and aspirations of their workers.

21. You’re not nice just for the sake of being nice…

Being too nice of a boss can actually be rather cruel, as Betty Liu points out in her LinkedIn piece. Artificially sweet managers heap on undeserved praise, then yank the rug out from under their employees later on.

So don’t play nice because you don’t like conflict. Be authentic and real with your workers. You’ll be doing them a big favor.

22. … and that means you’re able to make tough calls

Weak bosses flee from confrontation. Excellent workplace leaders don’t seek out uncomfortable situations, but when one arises, they can handle it. They do what needs to be done, whether it’s plotting a new course for a team or firing a problem employee.

23. You’re a good listener

This is the main reason why introverts make quite good bosses.

Many people have had a manager who loved to talk. Rarer — and infinitely more appreciated — are those bosses who are quality listeners. Good listening skills shows your employees that you’re seriously considering their opinions and needs.

24. You take an interest in your employees’ lives

Good bosses don’t cross the line into nosiness. Still, they care enough to ask about peoples’ summer plans, kids, and elderly parents. This interest will demonstrate to employees that their boss actually cares about them, making both parties more invested in their working relationship.

25. You tailor your approach

Different employees have different needs. “One size fits all” just isn’t going to cut it in the workplace. The best bosses are flexible. This allows them to fulfill all sorts of roles in order to better cater to the needs of their workers.

26. You demand effort…

Great leaders demand — and inspire — employees to work hard. They lead by example and give workers the tools they need to succeed through hard work.

27. … but you don’t demand perfection

Bosses who are too rigid are simply unrealistic. People make mistakes. It happens. If you punish small failures, you’ll just stifle innovation, experimentation and proactivity in your office.

28. You think you’re an awful leader

Business Insider recently spoke with TED legend and author Simon Sinek about leadership. He explained that individuals who believe themselves to be excellent leaders are often, in fact, terrible leaders. Great bosses recognize that authority and rank do not equal leadership abilities. As a result, they are constantly working to improve themselves. These quality bosses might even feel inadequate at times. However, just the fact that they recognize their own flaws renders them superior to many managers that totally lack self-awareness.

This piece was originally posted by Business Insider.

BarryStaff Holds Successful Job Fair

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There were several unknowns.

BarryStaff opened its Springfield branch in 2015 and expectations for a job fair in mid-June were somewhat tempered. Did people know about the new office? If not, were they willing to find it?

There was nothing to worry about.

The job fair, held June 8, was more successful than BarryStaff ever imagined. More than 50 percent of the applicants interviewed were qualified to fill oft-needed positions at Clark County area companies.

One man, who said he saw advertisements for the job fair in the newspaper and on TV, said people are willing to do anything to work.

“I think (job fairs) are a good thing,” he said. “There are a lot of people who need jobs and there are a lot of good workers who aren’t working.”

Roughly 25 people interviewed over the span of a few hours.

BarryStaff is currently in the midst of planning another job fair, this time at the company’s headquarters in Dayton. Details will be released as plans are finalized.

BarryStaff Celebrates 1 Year in New Facility

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BarryStaff is pleased to announce a milestone in its commitment to the downtown Dayton area.

The company’s brand new 13,000 square foot facility opened June 1, 2015 on Webster Street. One year later, BarryStaff continues to work with local companies to supply industrial, clerical and permanent job placements.

BarryStaff is also the only business in Dayton licensed to screen travelers for the TSA Pre-Check program.

Ground was broken on the new facility in December 2014. The 32-year-old business is proud of its downtown Dayton heritage, having operated from three other downtown locations since 1982.

“Our new facility has allowed us the space to better serve our applicants and expand our services to our clients,” said President and CEO Doug Barry.

The Pam and Warren Barry Community Room also opened in 2015. To date, more than 50 businesses and organizations have requested to utilize the room for off-site retreats. With enough space for 80 people, white boards and an exquisite view of downtown Dayton, BarryStaff is proud to serve business professionals on its home turf.

10 Interesting Facts About Ohio

Ohio

1. The Buckeye state

Ohio is popularly known as the Buckeye State. Reason….? The buckeye trees which are spread throughout the Ohio River Valley. These trees produce small brown nuts resembling the eye of a deer; and hence the name buckeye. Bonus fact: carrying one in your pocket brings good luck.

2. One and only Presidential Museum

Ohio is home to the “One and Only Presidential Museum” which honors John Hanson and eight others, who were elected and served one year terms before the Constitution was written. This being said John Hanson, technically becomes the first president of the United States.

3. Mother of modern Presidents

Ohio State has been nicknamed “Mother of Modern Presidents,” as Ohio is the birthplace of seven U.S. presidents: Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James Garfield, Benjamin Harrison, William McKinley, William H. Taft and Warren G. Harding. Two Ohio presidents: Grant and McKinley are portrayed on the US Currency, which is kind of a big deal, don’t you think.

4. River on fire

No! This isn’t a joke. The Cuyahoga River has caught fire at least 13 times and is therefore nicknamed “The River That Caught Fire.” It was one of the most polluted rivers in the country and would easily catch fire when sparks from the train would fall into the water. Only after elaborate media coverage it was cleaned up in 1969.

5. Glacial Grooves

The Glacial Grooves on Kelleys Island is a National Natural Landmark. It is considered to be the largest and most easily reachable such groove on this planet. It is quite amazing to see scratches and grooves on the bedrock left behind by the great ice sheet that covered part of North America 18,000 years ago, as it dragged over the surface.

6. The birthplace of aviation

Ohio is considered as “The Birthplace of Aviation.” The Wright Brothers, credited as inventors of the first airplane hailed from Dayton.

7. Astronaut’s hub

Ohio is home to 24 astronauts. Why so many? Role models such as Senator John Glenn, the oldest man to travel into outer space (“the first all Ohio crew”) and not to forget, Neil Armstrong, the first human ever to walk on the Moon have been inspirational for the buckeyes.

8. Home sweet Trash…?

Sounds gross right…? But it actually is pretty cool. A couple from Philo, Ohio has made a house completely out of trash and it turned out to be amazing. The idea was to show how much can be made out of recycled material and the couple nailed it. The house has now been opened up for tours.

9. Company in a basket

Longaberger Company takes the cake when it comes to being unique. Longaberger Company, a manufacturer of wood baskets and lifestyle products, Newark has its corporate office in the world’s largest basket. Today, it not only functions as the headquarters of the company but is a tourist attraction too. Thousands of fans flock to Newark every year to get a glimpse of the basket.

10. The Y Bridge

Would you believe it if I say that there’s a bridge which you can cross and still be on the same side of the river? Well believe it or not, the Y Bridge in Zanesville is one such bridge. It was opened in 1814 to span the confluence of the Licking and Muskingum Rivers and has been reconstructed four times at the same place.

Top Trends in Hiring for 2016

Hiring is a central focus in many companies’ human capital management (HCM) strategies. In 2016, hiring trends point to a stronger job market, an increased demand for talent, and a need for more strategic approaches to talent management. Here are a few of the most important trends as companies look to their hiring processes to help them achieve greater productivity, innovation, and long-term growth.

Leadership is Being Promoted From Within

Companies are coming to realize the value of promoting leaders from within. Cultivating internal talent for managers, vice presidents, and C-level executives can have several significant advantages. Leaders who come up with a company may better understand its culture and have a deeper commitment to its success. Senior hires can be expensive and leaders brought in from the outside may not have the same level of commitment to the company. Promoting from within may help reduce costs while improving corporate stability and results.

Companies Are Becoming Strategic About the Hiring Process

As the economy improves, there are more jobs available. For recruiters and hiring managers, this translates to increased competition for candidates and a need to focus on employee retention. Compensation, flexible scheduling and benefits are all ways companies are attempting to create an edge in the job market. Successful businesses are also investing in technology to help promote openings more effectively and to quickly screen candidates so top applicants can move more easily through the hiring process.

Employee Retention is Becoming a Major Focus

As the saying goes, “Your employees are your company’s most important asset.” Workers have more opportunities in the market today than during the recession, and as a result companies in 2016 are looking holistically at employee retention. From hiring the right people to fostering a great work environment, taking the strategic steps necessary to retain employees will be one of the year’s top hiring trends. Retaining employees can save money over replacing them, help raise levels of employee morale, and allow companies to cultivate their next generation of talent. Some ways companies are improving retention include new technology, more strategic compensation, and enhancements to the employee experience.

Compliance Remains Top of Mind

Hiring trends are also driving behind the scenes actions and decisions about process and HR infrastructure. Companies are facing ever higher demands around reporting and compliance with applicable laws at the local, state, and federal levels. As a result, companies are looking for ways to streamline their data management. HR technology remains an important part of the recruiter’s toolkit, from collecting necessary data during the hiring process to helping manage employee separations. Mobility and cloud-based tools will likely play a bigger role in the technology mix in the year ahead.

Hiring great people remains a top strategic priority for businesses in 2016. From improving retention to using HR software to streamline data flow, this year’s hiring trends are all about making staffing a competitive advantage for growing companies. Recruiters who understand and implement these trends may give themselves an important advantage in attracting and retaining top talent.

Top 20 Best Summer Jobs

Top 20 Best Summer Jobs

Ideally, the best thing you can do is try to find an internship that’s related to your degree or passion. This is the best way to gain real life experience as well as having something terrific to put on your resume. In reality, however, you have left finding an internship to the last moment, and now you find yourself searching for a job that pays well without consuming your entire summer.

No matter what job you’re doing over the summer, never forget to network. Speak to people, ask questions, learn new skills, and most importantly, have fun. And if you think you’re too good for a summer job, think again.

Some of the biggest stars in the world spent their summer mopping floors at a local Dairy Queen (Gwen Stefani) or saved up some extra cash as a paper boy (Tom Cruise). Matthew McConaughey found himself short of cash when traveling around Australia (before he was famous) and took a job on a farm moving chicken manure.

Here are a few great summer jobs to consider:

Top 20 Best Summer Jobs

  • Sales (The skills you learn in a sales job will help you for the rest of your life.)
  • Post office worker (Great pay!)
  • National Park services
  • Camp counselors (Not great pay but accommodation and food is free.)
  • Resort or country club (Get paid to live by the pool.)
  • Tour guide
  • Restaurant staff
  • Web design
  • Tutoring (Be your own boss – great pay!)
  • Telemarketing (Can you sell? Are you a talented speaker? Telemarketers may annoy you but the good ones can make a lot of money.)
  • Campus jobs/Working in the labs (Check out jobs area in your university.)
  • Construction worker
  • Valet
  • Pet and house sitting
  • Writing articles for sites that will pay you
  • Convention worker (Is the boat show in town?)
  • Landscaping
  • Lifeguards
  • Dog walker
  • Barista

How to Make the Job Search Process More Enjoyable Than a Trip to the Dentist

1) Break it down

Not as in MC Hammer moves, but if that helps, go for it!

The process is large and daunting. Where to begin? Well, at the beginning. Start with a self-evaluation or online assessment to keep things as objective (vs. emotionally driven or reactive) as possible.

You want to set yourself up for success, so make an effort to ensure that jobs to which you apply are relevant, of interest, mesh with your personality, fit within your requirements and meet most of your “desirable” components of a job.

2) Call in the troops

Ask for help.

I’ll say it again: ASK FOR HELP.

Why not? Your cousin could know a neighbor that has the best job that hasn’t even been posted yet. How do you know if you don’t ask? Why in the world do you want to make the process even more challenging?

Feel awkward asking for help? That’s okay. It’s really not “Hi. I’m unemployed. Whatcha got for me?” It’s more along the lines of perhaps having coffee with a previous colleague, neighbor or friend, sharing your story and stating you’d love to hear their suggestions regarding type of position, suggested companies and/or if they’d mind taking a look at your resume.

3) Stay organized

If you launch into a fierce job search, you need to make sure you keep up with the status of each position to which you’ve applied.

If you state you’re going to follow up with a recruiter (and you should) be sure to do so. If you’ve created a schedule outlining 3 information sessions/coffee talks with colleagues each week, why, that requires both planning and follow up. It can be overwhelming. Take it one step at a time.

To stay organized, use what works best for you. Perhaps it’s an app, an online calendar or you prefer to rock the old school folder option (in my opinion, this is the most effective).

4) Do something fun

Bribing is so underrated.

Looking for a job will feel like a job.

Set yourself up for small rewards. Granted, probably your cash flow is a bit more limited, so I’m not saying take yourself out for a lobster dinner nightly. Perhaps it’s just giving yourself “me” time, a relaxing bath, a run at the park, taking your daughter to lunch, meeting up with a friend, reading a book, etc.

Still, if you look forward to it, it helps get you through the tedious parts (say, oh, completing yet another job application!).

5) Learn something new

If the job search process is occurring while you’re unemployed, perhaps you find yourself with a little extra time on your hands.

Now’s a great time to learn a new skill. Coursera.org and other sites have amazing free courses that are from our nation’s (and other countries, in fact) top schools. It’s an instant ego boost and conversation starter “So, yeah, I’m also taking this Leading Strategic Innovation in Organizations course and thinking about enrolling in Penn State’s Creativity, Innovation and Change.

If courses aren’t of interest, what about a new sport or outside activity? If neither is of interest, perhaps consider volunteering.

Stay positive, proactive and professional. Easier said than done, absolutely.