If You’re Sick, Stay Away From Work. If You Can’t, Here Is What Doctors Advise.

BY

The New York Times

When Elle Fraser, a business operations assistant for the New Jersey Devils, came down with the flu just before Thanksgiving last year, she didn’t think about staying home from work.

The hockey team had home games on Wednesday and Friday that week, and she worried that her work would never get done without her, even if she had a 103-degree fever.

She toughed it out, alternating between chills and sweats, falling asleep at her desk, wiping down every surface she touched, and insisting to co-workers she was wearing mittens to handle tickets only because she was cold.

On that Wednesday, Ms. Fraser, 23, worked from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. On Thanksgiving Day, she slept most of the day. The next day, she went back to work, just as sick as she was on Wednesday.

Sure, she technically had a choice to use a sick day and stay home, but that was not how she saw it. She thought she didn’t really have a choice.

“Nobody tries to convince you to go home because they knew in that situation they’d be doing the same thing,” she said.

Some people might read her account as a tribute to hard work and selflessness. Others might be aghast that she had risked exposing others to illness.

It’s clear on which side doctors come down: They say workers with the flu or a cold should use sick days far more often than they do. Though millions of Americans don’t get paid time off when they’re sick, those who do have the option often don’t take it.

“If it’s bad enough that you’re wondering if you should stay home, you should probably stay home,” said Dr. Pritish K. Tosh, an infectious diseases researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

When, and how long, should you stay home?

Remember: It’s not just about you.

Even if you can battle the flu by enduring a miserable week, it can be deadly for others, especially pregnant women, young children and older people. And no matter how many precautions you take, there’s no way to eliminate risk to people around you.

As a general rule, Dr. Tosh suggested people stay home until they are fever-free for 24 hours. He said he stayed out of work for three or four days the last time he had the flu.

“People can be infectious even before they start to have symptoms, but most of the time that they’re going to be most infectious is going to be when they are sickest, especially if they’re having fevers,” he said.

Infectious germs are spread most frequently by airborne “respiratory droplets” from sneezing and coughing. The flu virus can last for up to 24 hours depending on the surface, Dr. Tosh said.

By coughing or sneezing into your hands, or wiping a runny nose, your hands can spread the germs to everything you touch — including surfaces many other people touch, such as door knobs, elevator buttons or shopping carts.

“You’re never truly not contagious until all of those symptoms are resolved,” said Dr. David Shih, executive vice president of strategy, health and innovation at CityMD, which runs a chain of urgent care centers in New Jersey, New York and Washington.

How can you limit the exposure to others?

Let’s say you’re ignoring the doctors and going out into the world anyway.

You’re not alone: A CityMD survey in August found that 69 percent of Americans with the flu or flulike symptoms said they went to the drugstore or a pharmacy, 43 percent said they went to the grocery store and 39 percent said they went to work. Millennials (76 percent) were far more likely than those 35 or older (56 percent) to have left the house the last time they were sick.

Though you can’t eliminate the risk of infecting others, there are steps you can take to minimize it:

• Get in the habit of coughing and sneezing into your elbow, not your hand. Children are being taught to cough like Dracula.

• Limit your interaction with other people as much as possible. If you’re going to work, consider skipping nonessential meetings.

• Avoid physical contact with other people, especially shaking hands.

• Wipe surfaces down after touching them.

• Use hand sanitizer or wash your hands after coughing or sneezing.

• Wear a mask to limit the respiratory droplets.

• Take medication to reduce your symptoms.

Oh, by the way, get your flu shot.

What about people who don’t have sick days?

Stay-at-home parents scoff at the idea of sick days, as do millions of other workers whose jobs don’t offer paid time off.

“For people who are living paycheck to paycheck or have significant debt, the risks of staying home and losing pay or potentially losing their job are far too great,” said Vicki Shabo, vice president for workplace policies and strategies at the National Partnership for Women and Families.

Low-income earners and part-time workers are especially likely to work while sick, including those at restaurants and hospitals. Ms. Shabo and advocates like her are pushing for laws mandating paid sick days, which are in place or will be soon in eight states, 30 cities and two counties.

“It’s important from a public health perspective, and a workplace morale perspective, that people can take the time they need to recover,” she said.

Click here to read the original article.

This is the scariest job interview question — and how to answer it

By Anita Hamilton

Mic.com

There’s nothing quite like the spine-tingling jolt of getting called in for a job interview after weeks of sending out your resume, crossing your fingers and mostly getting a bunch of canned emails thanking you for submitting your application in response. But that initial excitement can quickly turn to anxiety if you’re not prepared once you finally walk in the door.

As it turns out, interviewing in person is the most intimidating part of the job search process, according to a survey of 570 undergraduates and recent college grads by career site WayUp. The fear factor doesn’t end there either.

Once you sit down face-to-face with your interviewer, what’s the “scariest” question you could get asked? For nearly 41% of current undergraduates and 35% of recent grads who replied to the online survey conducted in October, it was: “Out of all the other candidates, why should we hire you?”

That question beat out four other choices, including, “What are your biggest strengths and weaknesses?” and “Where do you see yourself in five years?”

Students and recent grads alike said they were most intimidated by by being put on the spot about why an employer should hire them in particular.Source: WayUp/WayUp

 

How to answer the toughest question

“Basically the entire interview boils down to this question,” Vicki Salemi, a career expert at Monster, said in a phone interview. Thankfully, making a case for why you’re the best fit for the job isn’t all that hard — so long as you’ve got your answer figured out in advance. “You need to be convincing and honest, but also have your talking points ready to go,” she added.

The best kind of answer achieves two goals: It demonstrates what you bring to the job, and it conveys your respect for and understanding of their business. The more precisely you can quantify your answers the better.

Here are a couple of sample answers you might give:

“Your company is a leader in industry X, and that is an area I excel in as well, as you can see from the fact that I have been the top sales person on a 10-person team also doing X for the last two years.”

“I’m a great fit for this position because it requires excellent project management skills, and I led the rollout of products X, Y and Z at my last job, which boosted revenue by 30% over the last year.”

If you’re new to the job market and don’t have hard numbers to quantify your skills, you can go with a softer approach, such as:

“You mentioned that attention to detail is a key aspect of this job. In my last job [or internship] at company Y, I got top marks for this in my reviews by doing A, B and C, which saved the company both time and money.”

And if the interviewer asks you about a skill you don’t have, you can get around that by using an example that shows you are a self-starter:

“I haven’t done that before, but I’m a quick learner. For example, in my last job at company Y, I learned the billing system in 2 days, compared to the full week it typically took new hires.”

The key here is to “know your unique value proposition,” which should be tailored to the job and the company, career expert Heather Huhman said: “If you don’t know it, you’re never going to be able to sell yourself to an employer.”

Click here to read the original article.

BBB & BARRYSTAFF Say Job Seekers Beware: Scammers Prey On Online Job Seekers

DAYTON, OHIO, October 25, 2017 — Better Business Bureau serving Dayton and the Miami Valley and BARRYSTAFF warn job seekers to be wary of scammers online posing as companies hiring. More and more job-related scams are being reported to BBB’s Scam Tracker. Most victims tend to be college age and seeking employment. However, this scam targets every age. These scammers intend to steal your identity and/or your hard-earned cash.

 

Typically, many of these scams start when victims are contacted by what appears to be reputable firms advising them they have been “hired.” The scammer sends the victim a check and is instructed to deposit the funds and send a portion back to the scammer. The check is not real and once your bank realizes it, you are responsible for paying back the funds sent to the scammer, not to mention any other funds you happened to use, as well as any fees your bank may charge.

 

One consumer recently posted to BBB’s Scam Tracker that she had found a job posting on Indeed for a job as a mystery shopper for Kroger. After responding to the posting, she received a check for $2,480 and was instructed to deposit the money into her account. Then, she was also told to keep $250 for her salary, but use the rest to shop Walmart (buy product, use Walmart to Walmart money transfer and Moneygram transfer).

 

Doug Barry of the BARRYSTAFF employment agency in Dayton says this impacts his business because most of his job seekers come by way of Indeed. Thousands of people apply through the website every day.

 

“Job seekers need to know employment agencies like ours will never ask them for anything until we meet with them,” Barry said. “We’ll never send a check before meeting with a job seeker. We’ll never ask anyone to do any banking either.”

 

BBB and BARRYSTAFF offer the following tips to help you avoid employment scams:

  • Remember legitimate companies will not ask you to deposit a check and send funds back to them.
  • Be wary of companies offering a high salary for unskilled labor, asking for an advance fee or making offers that simply sound too good to be true.
  • Avoid companies using e-mail addresses that are Gmail, Hotmail, etc. Legitimate firms usually do not use public e-mail accounts.
  • Be cautious of messages using improper grammar and spelling, indicating the sender could be from a foreign company.
  • Take the time to ask lots of questions. Vague answers are a red flag that should arouse your suspicion.
  • Always be wary of work-from-home or secret shopper positions, or any job with a generic title. Positions that don’t require special training or licensing appeal to a wide range of applicants. Scammers know this and use these otherwise legitimate titles in their fake ads.
  • Check the real company’s job page to see if the position is posted there if the job posting is for a well-known brand.
  • Look online; if the job comes up in other cities with the exact same post, it’s likely a scam.
  • Beware of offers made without an interview. A real company will want to talk to a candidate before hiring.
  • Keep in mind government agencies post all jobs publically and freely. The U.S. and Canadian federal governments and the U.S. Postal Service/Canada Postal Service never charge for information about jobs or applications for jobs.
  • Be wary of any offer to give you special access or guarantee you a job for a fee – if you are paying for the promise of a job, it’s probably a scam.
  • Get all details and contracts in writing. A legitimate recruiter will provide you with a complete contract for their services with cost, what you get, who pays (you or the employer), and what happens if you do not find a job.

John North, BBB president and CEO, says, “Don’t let stress over looking for a new job make you vulnerable to scams. It can be tough to tell the difference between a legitimate opportunity and a bogus job offering. Scammers are sophisticated and are always tweaking their ploy and evolving with the times and technology, making it more important than ever to take your time, be skeptical and do your research. Better Business Bureau is always a great resource. Visit bbb.org or call (937) 222-5825 or (800) 776-5301.”

 

About Your BBB Serving Dayton and the Miami Valley

For more than 100 years, Better Business Bureau has been helping people find businesses, brands and charities they can trust. In 2014, people turned to BBB more than 165 million times for BBB Business Reviews on more than 4.7 million businesses and Charity Reports on 11,000 charities, all available for free at bbb.org. BBB serving Dayton and the Miami Valley is one of 113 local, independent BBBs across the United States, Canada and Mexico. BBB serving Dayton and the Miami Valley serves seven and half Ohio counties, including Clark, Darke, Greene, Miami, Montgomery, Preble, Shelby and northern Warren counties. Your Dayton-based BBB is unique in that it provides business solutions and consumer services in specialized areas to other BBBs, businesses and consumers. It remains focused on the Miami Valley, but through these key products and services, it is an international organization.

 

About BARRYSTAFF

BARRYSTAFF has been putting people to work for over 30 years and remains the most successful locally-owned staffing agency in Dayton, OH.

 

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8 Do’s And Don’ts When You Apply For A Job Online

By James Hu, Next Avenue Contributor

Job board sites like Indeed or SimplyHired make it seem easy to apply for a job online. They have a system that keeps your resumé in tow to readily submit. And many offer One Click Application services, auto-filling your personal information in the designated areas. However, I’m willing to bet you’ve never even received a response from one of these applications.

That’s why I’m offering eight Do’s and Don’ts to effectively guide you through the process of applying for jobs online:

1. DO check out the company’s website before you apply. This one is two-fold.

First, recruiters want to see that you have a special interest in their company. They’re more likely to pursue a candidate who has a history with the company or industry and a story about why they’re applying now. Take the time to learn its mission and values. Then, incorporate those into your job history and cover letter. This will help you stand out among other applicants who applied without doing their homework.

Second, checking out the company’s website helps you see if the firm is one where you’d want to work. Isn’t it better to know before you fill out an application that the business doesn’t match your values or is further than you’d like to commute? Save yourself and the recruiter time and only fill out applications for places where you would be happy working.

2. DO tailor your resumé keywords for each job you’ll apply for online. The tendency when applying to jobs online is to quickly submit your resumé and cover letter and move forward. That’s a mistake,

The reason? When applying for a job online, there is a high chance your application will go right into an Applicant Tracking System (ATS) to be reviewed by a recruiter. Applicant Tracking Systems parse and sort resumés by topics or keywords, like education or managing a budget.

Credit: Shutterstock

In order to optimize your resumé for ATS, you should match the keywords in it to the job description the company provides. Online tools (shameless plug: ones such as my company’s Jobscan.co) can help you identify the right keywords by copy and pasting your resumé and the job description into the site.

3. DO add your up-to-date LinkedIn profile. More and more companies now request you include a link to your LinkedIn profile in their job applications. Having an active LinkedIn profile helps show a recruiter that you’re serious about your job search and career. Many recruiters will search for it anyway, so making their job easier goes a long way toward making yourself a worthy candidate.

You can include more information about your background and skills on LinkedIn than through a normal job application, so take advantage of this opportunity.

Before you link to it, though, make sure your LinkedIn profile is job-search ready. Add a great picture, show some of your recent projects and make sure you’re active in relevant LinkedIn networks. For more insights on getting your LinkedIn profile recruiter ready, check out this great post from The Muse: “The 31 Best LinkedIn Profile Tips for Jobseekers.”

4. DO write a cover letter. Although a cover letter is sometimes optional for an online job application, you should always submit one. A cover letter is a great way to talk more about yourself and your experience and to incorporate the company’s values and mission statement into your application.

Including a cover letter also has a more tactical advantage. Many Applicant Tracking Systems will account for a cover letter when recruiters search by keywords.

5. DO make sure the application on the company site is the same as the one on the job board. This is especially important with job-board features such as “one click apply” or “quick apply.” The company site may ask for something specific, like a salary requirement, or request you email someone your resumé and cover letter. If you apply without looking at the instructions and miss something, it will look like you can’t follow directions.

 

3 Things Not to Do When You Apply for a Job Online

1. DON’T type lazily or in shorthand. Sometimes, our online habits win out without us even realizing it. I occasionally receive applications where the candidate’s name is all lowercase. Not taking the time to capitalize the first letters of your name tells me three things: 1) You lack attention to detail; 2) You are lazy and 3) Working here is not important to you. You don’t want a recruiter to think any of those!

Many people also associate writing online with informality. But when you apply for a job online, you want to look professional and that means writing more formally. For example, for a cover letter, fill a page and use a formal heading.

2. DON’T use auto-fill to apply for positions. Sure, this makes things easier, but you’ll be trading results for ease. If you have ever looked back at the information loaded into your application when using auto-fill, you may have seen that it didn’t align correctly. Your “Position” answer might instead say which college you attended. Or prior employment dates might just show start dates

Auto-fill may also format the details of your job history in a strange or confusing way. Instead of leaving this to chance, fill in the details one at a time, double-checking as you go.

3. DON’T leave sections incomplete. It can feel redundant to upload your resumé and then type in your work history manually, so the temptation can be to leave that section blank. Don’t!

On many Applicant Tracking Systems, the information typed in for job history is more visible than the resumé, which someone would have to click to view.

Don’t forget to tailor these sections in the same way you would tailor your resumé to match the necessary keywords to really optimize your resumé.

Click here to read the original piece published on Forbes.com.

 

 

September Jobs Data

DAYTON, OH – This morning the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics issued employment data for the month of September.

The national unemployment rate for September was 4.2 percent. It was 4.4 percent in August. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics said hurricane Harvey and Irma had “no discernible effect on the national unemployment rate.”

In spite of the unemployment rate, which is at its lowest level since early 2001, the economy lost 33,000 jobs. The BLS reports a steep employment decline in food services and drinking places and below-trend growth in some other industries likely reflected the impact of Hurricanes Irma and Harvey. Employment rose in health care and in transportation and warehousing.

“We continue to see hiring on a local level that’s similar to what we’ve seen in past months,” Barry said. “As we transition to colder weather we’ll see some areas of employment change.”

For example, landscaping will trend downward while retail will pick up.

BarryStaff is an award-winning employment agency that hires workers for more than 100 employers throughout the Miami Valley. The majority of them are in manufacturing.

In manufacturing, the industry has added an average of 14,000 jobs per month from November of last year through August. New data shows that manufacturing employment was virtually unchanged in September.

“We’re still seeing a worker shortage at all levels in the Miami Valley,” Barry said.

Employment in other major industries, including mining, construction, wholesale trade, retail trade, information, and government, showed little change over the month.

 

 

Why robots won’t steal human jobs in manufacturing

By Joe Kaeser, President and CEO of Siemens AG.

There is a widely held view about what is coming in manufacturing. It goes something like: Move over, humans. We don’t need you anymore. Robots will take it from here.

But it isn’t true. This is not manufacturing’s future.

People have feared the march of the machine for centuries. Yet for just as long, machines have changed work; they have not replaced it. And the emerging fourth industrial revolution — even with its digital, automated assembly lines — is not an exception to this trend. As this new way of doing business becomes a reality, humans and machines will each play a critical role in manufacturing’s success.

Here are a couple reasons why.

First, it is true that digital manufacturing does cut out the middle-man. More and more routine, repetitive assembly tasks will be taken over by machines. But as certain jobs disappear, new ones open up in other parts of the factory. Germany in many ways exemplifies this trend. Today, German manufacturers deploy three times more robots than U.S. companies, but they also still employ more humans. Relative to the size of our economies, German’s manufacturing workforce is twice the size of America’s.

Second, from its very beginning, the fourth industrial revolution has never presented manufacturers with an either-or choice — robots or humans. It has always been about combining the talents of both. Ultimately, it is the convergence of artificial and human intelligence that will enable manufacturers to achieve a new era of speed, flexibility, efficiency and connectivity in the 21st century. Machines have the ability to assemble things faster than any human ever could, but humans possess the analytics, domain expertise and valuable knowledge required to solve problems and optimize factory floor production.

This is precisely what we now see at Siemens’ Amberg Electronics Plant in, yes, Germany. Over the past 25 years, Amberg has evolved into a fully digital plant, with automation rising tremendously. But what has changed the most during this time isn’t the number of employees; what has changed is productivity. The same size workforce — about 1,200 workers who have been trained and retrained for digital manufacturing — has increased productivity by more than 1,000%.

For now, Amberg is something of an exception. But it won’t be for long.

Where we are now is only beginning. Artificial intelligence is here and being rapidly commercialized, with new applications being created not just for manufacturing, but also for energy, healthcare and oil and gas. This will change how we all do business. There has never been a bigger opportunity for us to add value for customers — and that’s what makes this new machine age unstoppable.

At the same time, companies have both a business need and social responsibility to be equally invested in humans. The transformation of the factory floor must be met by a large-scale, company-led commitment to industrial reskilling for current and aspiring employees. The responsibility is now ours to ensure that digital manufacturing is accessible to anyone willing to learn, work hard and pursue new pathways in training.

Germany has long confronted the human challenge with a dual system of education — a public-private system that invests in, promotes and continuously updates training and educational pathways to established and growing industries. Participants attend public vocational schools while receiving on-the-job training on industry standards through a paid apprenticeship in a private-sector company.

This system also serves a dual purpose to both business and society: companies win by having a strong pipeline of workers with relevant skills and knowledge; society wins as young people gain fast tracks into good-paying jobs and exciting careers with ladders to climb, increasing economic opportunity and strengthening the middle class.

Industry leaders just have to remember that, while robots are programmable, with humans, trust is earned. We have to prove that digital manufacturing is inclusive. Then, the true narrative will emerge: Welcome, robots. You’ll help us. But humans are still our future.

Click here to read the original article published by Time.com.

5 misconceptions about the staffing industry

Perception versus reality.

Business owners often seek to control the perception of their companies so that they accurately reflect reality. This is easier said than done. Perceptions are like habits – they tend to die hard. The staffing business has long battled a sometimes lackluster perception. At BARRYSTAFF, here are the most common misconceptions we run into … and how we set the record straight.

“Temporary” employees are nothing more than short-term fixes. In truth, the term “temp” is outdated. We no longer refer to ourselves as a “temp agency,” but rather as a “staffing company.” There’s a significant difference. Gone are the days when folks would show up to the local agency each morning and collect a paycheck for a single job later that afternoon. In reality, what we’re doing is probably much different than what people are prone to imagining.

We give companies employees to try out on a limited basis. If an employee is working out then companies may extend a permanent job offer after 90 days. We handle everything until that job offer is extended. This process allows the company – and the employee – to feel each other out. One of the key analytics we study is our retention rate. In other words, we want our companies and employees to stick together. That’s our goal.

We only staff for one industry. While it’s true that staffing companies have specializations (BARRYSTAFF’s is manufacturing), many agencies are capable of recruiting for many, many fields. At BARRYSTAFF, we have placed architects, engineers and chemists. We have an entire team solely dedicated to filling clerical positions. So while manufacturing is our wheelhouse, we’ll never turn away someone looking for a communications position. Or graphic design. Or IT. We can help them too.

Job seekers have to pay to use our service. Job seekers pay nothing. Zero. Zilch. That’s not how we make money. Instead, the companies we partner with pay us to help them find quality employees. No job seeker will ever need to pay a dime to a company like BARRYSTAFF.

We only offer dead end jobs. The fact of the matter is that there is plenty of room for advancement in the jobs we hire for. Many of our placements have gone on to management positions.

We only work with struggling companies (Why else would they need a staffing company?) This is one we have to push back against fairly often. We work with big companies and small companies. Some are international. Others are hyper local. They use us because it is time-consuming to search, interview and drug screen candidates. It’s expensive. It cuts down on production. Advertising alone can run up a hefty tab. And these days, the job search is changing drastically from year to year. We live in a fast-paced digital world now, and our clients need to stay focused on what they’re doing. More of them are trusting experts like BARRYSTAFF to handle this work. It’s a specialized service during a time of rapid change.

And our services don’t stop at staffing. We often find ourselves working as a fully- functional HR branch for companies. It’s just another amenity we’re proud to offer.

 

 

DO NOT friend these kinds of coworkers on Facebook

By Nicole Lyn Pesce

Settling into a new job can be tricky IRL – and straight up confusing online.

A 2012 Millennial Branding Survey found young adults become Facebook friends with an average of 16 of their coworkers, but research suggests we should connect at our own risk.  After all, more than half of surveyed workers (51%) said social shows them too much information about their coworkers, according to a recent Pew Research report. And 29% of employees ages 18 to 29 found something on social media that lowered their professional opinion of a colleague.

But the rules of online engagement keep changing as more of us use social networks to actually, you know, network. “Ten years ago, it was taboo to friend your coworkers,” said Winnie Sun, a financial adviser and consultant on Millennial matters. “But nowadays, we’re all building our personal brands and making these connections.”

So Sun and Leonard Kim, a personal branding expert and author of “The Etiquette of Social Media,” spoke to Moneyish about the dos and don’ts of linking with colleagues online.

DON’T: FRIEND ABOVE YOUR PAY GRADE. That means your boss and your company’s C-Suite are off-limits. “You want them to respect you professionally so you can progress forward in your career,” said Kim. But seeing your casual conversations or pictures of you in a bathing suit can shatter that professional image. “And recovering what was lost from that level of respect is going to be quite difficult,” Kim said, who added that colleagues in the same position as you, or who work outside of your department, are more fair game.

The exception to this rule is LinkedIn. “LinkedIn is the same as if you walked into your new office building, and started going up to people and saying, ‘Hi, I’m working here now, and I’m excited to come on board,’” Sun said.

DO: USE THIS ‘MEAL TEST’ FOR HELP. Different social networks suggest different levels of intimacy. LinkedIn and Twitter are ways to introduce yourself, share industry news and support others in your field. “But Facebook and Instagram are like going out to lunch and dinner,” said Sun, where you’re sharing pieces of your personal life like news about your kids and your pets, or pictures from your vacation. “Snapchat is happy hour,” she added. “If we’re close enough to grab drinks and cut loose a bit, then we can connect on Snapchat.” And don’t send friend requests to colleagues with private pages – that’s a clear indicator they don’t want to mix business with pleasure.

DON’T: FRIEND REQUEST PEOPLE YOUR FIRST DAY ON THE JOB.  If you haven’t had lunch or a conversation with colleagues in real life, it’s off-putting to friend them online. “The time frame for connecting with them [online] is after you build a personal bond. I’d recommend a minimum of one, but at least two months,” said Kim. “Following someone on Twitter is a lot less creepy than immediately adding someone on Facebook.”

DO: TEST THE WATERS WITH LINKEDIN. If someone green lights your connection request on LinkedIn, it opens the door for stronger social media relationships later. “If they accept, send a quick note saying, ‘Thank you so much for connecting. I’m excited to come on board,’” said Sun. “And if they respond to that … you know that person has a warmer personality.” And if the conversation continues, Kim suggests writing back after a few months to say that you might send him or her a Facebook invitation to continue networking, and take it from there.

DO: LOOK AT YOUR CONTENT. Are you really comfortable with coworkers seeing your posts? If you use Facebook and Twitter for business, like posting industry news and insights, then adding your coworkers makes sense. But you don’t want to give professional peers access to Snapchat or even Instagram and FB pages where you’re sharing provocative pix or posting statuses where you argue, put people down or suffer emotional breakdowns.

Click here to check out the original article on Moneyish.