Plastic Mold Injection Operator (Vandalia, OH)

Get your foot in the door with a company that has a great future!

BARRYSTAFF is looking for entry-level plastic injection molders on all shifts.

1st shift is 6am – 2:30pm

2nd shift is 2pm – 10pm

3rd shift is 10:30pm – 6:30am

Second and third shifts match up with the RTA schedule in case you don’t have transportation.

This company will train you!

About BARRYSTAFF:

The job search can be a pain. That’s why we’re here.

BARRYSTAFF has been putting people to work for over 30 years and remains the most successful locally-owned staffing agency in Dayton. With offices in Dayton, Piqua and Springfield, we specialize in industrial, clerical, and permanent placements. If you are looking for a new career, or if you are an employer looking for new talent, you are in the right place.

Welcome to BARRYSTAFF. Let’s go to work.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $8.50 /hour

Click here to apply via Indeed.com

You can also email your resume to a BARRYSTAFF recruiter at

recruiter@barrystaff.com

Blower Shaft Assembly (Dayton, OH)

BARRYSTAFFis looking for someone to work for a company in Dayton thatprovides blower shafts to a variety of manufacturers throughout the US.

Hours:6am – 4:30pm (M-TH)

Must have a pair of leather work boots you can wear. Must also have high school diploma (or GED), a good work history and clean background.

About BARRYSTAFF:

The job search can be a pain. That’s why we’re here.

BARRYSTAFF has been putting people to work for over 30 years and remains the most successful locally-owned staffing agency in Dayton. With offices in Dayton, Piqua and Springfield, we specialize in industrial, clerical, and permanent placements. If you are looking for a new career, or if you are an employer looking for new talent, you are in the right place.

Welcome to BARRYSTAFF. Let’s go to work.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $10.00 /hour

Click here to apply via Indeed.com

You can also email your resume to a BARRYSTAFF recruiter at

recruiter@barrystaff.com

Machine Operator (Urbana, OH)

BARRYSTAFFis looking for machine operatorswith excellent work history that wants to join a team environment with great long-term potential.

Shifts available: 1st and 3rd

Must have a clean background and be able to pass a drug test

Must have excellent attendance habits

Must have prior machine operator, assembly experience

About BARRYSTAFF:

The job search can be a pain. That’s why we’re here.

BARRYSTAFF has been putting people to work for over 30 years and remains the most successful locally-owned staffing agency in Dayton. With offices in Dayton, Piqua and Springfield, we specialize in industrial, clerical, and permanent placements. If you are looking for a new career, or if you are an employer looking for new talent, you are in the right place.

Welcome to BARRYSTAFF. Let’s go to work.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $12.00 to $13.00 /hour

Click here to apply via Indeed.com

You can also email your resume to a BARRYSTAFF recruiter at

recruiter@barrystaff.com

Assembler (Dayton, OH)

BARRYSTAFF is looking for assemblers to work at a production facility in Dayton. Operations include, but are not limited to: planting, insulating, gauging and marking taps, tapping, potting, welding, coil and coil assembly testing and more.

Must be able to demonstrate basic counting skills, hand dexterity and lift up to 55 pounds. Must be able to determine different colors. Also:

High school diploma or GED

Must be reliable and dependable

Previous assembly experience a plus

Must be willing to learn

Hours: 1st shift from 6am – 2:30pm (M-F)

About BARRYSTAFF:

The job search can be a pain. That’s why we’re here.

BARRYSTAFF has been putting people to work for over 30 years and remains the most successful locally-owned staffing agency in Dayton. With offices in Dayton, Piqua and Springfield, we specialize in industrial, clerical, and permanent placements. If you are looking for a new career, or if you are an employer looking for new talent, you are in the right place.

Welcome to BARRYSTAFF. Let’s go to work.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $11.00 /hour

Click here to apply via Indeed.com

You can also email your resume to a BARRYSTAFF recruiter at

recruiter@barrystaff.com

Springfield Jobs: CNC, Welder, Machine Operator (Springfield, OH)

We have several positions available at facilities across Clark and Champaign counties.

Mig and Tig welder

1st shift (7 AM to 3:30PM)

$12.50 an hour

Small company

1 year experience or welding certificate

Must have transportation

CNC Operator

1st shift (5 AM to 3:30 PM) and 2nd shift (3:30 PM to 1:45 AM)

Pay $10 to $11 an hour

1 year experience

Heavy lifting

Must have a clean back ground and be able to work overtime

Resume required

Paint Line Loaders, Machine Operators and Welders in Urbana

1st and 3rd shift available

$12 to $16 an hour

Must be able to lift up to 70 pounds

Clean background

Must have personal transportation

Good work history

Machine Helper

1st, 2nd and 3rd shift availabilities

$11.50 an hour (and must be able to work overtime)

Must work at a fast pace

Be able to lift up to 70 pounds

High school diploma or GED

Be able to read a tape measure

About BARRYSTAFF:

The job search can be a pain. That’s why we’re here.

BARRYSTAFF has been putting people to work for over 30 years and remains the most successful locally-owned staffing agency in Dayton. With offices in Dayton, Piqua and Springfield, we specialize in industrial, clerical, and permanent placements. If you are looking for a new career, or if you are an employer looking for new talent, you are in the right place.

Welcome to BARRYSTAFF. Let’s go to work.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $10.00 to $16.00 /hour

Click here to apply via Indeed.com

You can also email your resume to a BARRYSTAFF recruiter at

recruiter@barrystaff.com

September Jobs Data

DAYTON, OH – This morning the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics issued employment data for the month of September.

The national unemployment rate for September was 4.2 percent. It was 4.4 percent in August. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics said hurricane Harvey and Irma had “no discernible effect on the national unemployment rate.”

In spite of the unemployment rate, which is at its lowest level since early 2001, the economy lost 33,000 jobs. The BLS reports a steep employment decline in food services and drinking places and below-trend growth in some other industries likely reflected the impact of Hurricanes Irma and Harvey. Employment rose in health care and in transportation and warehousing.

“We continue to see hiring on a local level that’s similar to what we’ve seen in past months,” Barry said. “As we transition to colder weather we’ll see some areas of employment change.”

For example, landscaping will trend downward while retail will pick up.

BarryStaff is an award-winning employment agency that hires workers for more than 100 employers throughout the Miami Valley. The majority of them are in manufacturing.

In manufacturing, the industry has added an average of 14,000 jobs per month from November of last year through August. New data shows that manufacturing employment was virtually unchanged in September.

“We’re still seeing a worker shortage at all levels in the Miami Valley,” Barry said.

Employment in other major industries, including mining, construction, wholesale trade, retail trade, information, and government, showed little change over the month.

 

 

Why robots won’t steal human jobs in manufacturing

By Joe Kaeser, President and CEO of Siemens AG.

There is a widely held view about what is coming in manufacturing. It goes something like: Move over, humans. We don’t need you anymore. Robots will take it from here.

But it isn’t true. This is not manufacturing’s future.

People have feared the march of the machine for centuries. Yet for just as long, machines have changed work; they have not replaced it. And the emerging fourth industrial revolution — even with its digital, automated assembly lines — is not an exception to this trend. As this new way of doing business becomes a reality, humans and machines will each play a critical role in manufacturing’s success.

Here are a couple reasons why.

First, it is true that digital manufacturing does cut out the middle-man. More and more routine, repetitive assembly tasks will be taken over by machines. But as certain jobs disappear, new ones open up in other parts of the factory. Germany in many ways exemplifies this trend. Today, German manufacturers deploy three times more robots than U.S. companies, but they also still employ more humans. Relative to the size of our economies, German’s manufacturing workforce is twice the size of America’s.

Second, from its very beginning, the fourth industrial revolution has never presented manufacturers with an either-or choice — robots or humans. It has always been about combining the talents of both. Ultimately, it is the convergence of artificial and human intelligence that will enable manufacturers to achieve a new era of speed, flexibility, efficiency and connectivity in the 21st century. Machines have the ability to assemble things faster than any human ever could, but humans possess the analytics, domain expertise and valuable knowledge required to solve problems and optimize factory floor production.

This is precisely what we now see at Siemens’ Amberg Electronics Plant in, yes, Germany. Over the past 25 years, Amberg has evolved into a fully digital plant, with automation rising tremendously. But what has changed the most during this time isn’t the number of employees; what has changed is productivity. The same size workforce — about 1,200 workers who have been trained and retrained for digital manufacturing — has increased productivity by more than 1,000%.

For now, Amberg is something of an exception. But it won’t be for long.

Where we are now is only beginning. Artificial intelligence is here and being rapidly commercialized, with new applications being created not just for manufacturing, but also for energy, healthcare and oil and gas. This will change how we all do business. There has never been a bigger opportunity for us to add value for customers — and that’s what makes this new machine age unstoppable.

At the same time, companies have both a business need and social responsibility to be equally invested in humans. The transformation of the factory floor must be met by a large-scale, company-led commitment to industrial reskilling for current and aspiring employees. The responsibility is now ours to ensure that digital manufacturing is accessible to anyone willing to learn, work hard and pursue new pathways in training.

Germany has long confronted the human challenge with a dual system of education — a public-private system that invests in, promotes and continuously updates training and educational pathways to established and growing industries. Participants attend public vocational schools while receiving on-the-job training on industry standards through a paid apprenticeship in a private-sector company.

This system also serves a dual purpose to both business and society: companies win by having a strong pipeline of workers with relevant skills and knowledge; society wins as young people gain fast tracks into good-paying jobs and exciting careers with ladders to climb, increasing economic opportunity and strengthening the middle class.

Industry leaders just have to remember that, while robots are programmable, with humans, trust is earned. We have to prove that digital manufacturing is inclusive. Then, the true narrative will emerge: Welcome, robots. You’ll help us. But humans are still our future.

Click here to read the original article published by Time.com.

5 misconceptions about the staffing industry

Perception versus reality.

Business owners often seek to control the perception of their companies so that they accurately reflect reality. This is easier said than done. Perceptions are like habits – they tend to die hard. The staffing business has long battled a sometimes lackluster perception. At BARRYSTAFF, here are the most common misconceptions we run into … and how we set the record straight.

“Temporary” employees are nothing more than short-term fixes. In truth, the term “temp” is outdated. We no longer refer to ourselves as a “temp agency,” but rather as a “staffing company.” There’s a significant difference. Gone are the days when folks would show up to the local agency each morning and collect a paycheck for a single job later that afternoon. In reality, what we’re doing is probably much different than what people are prone to imagining.

We give companies employees to try out on a limited basis. If an employee is working out then companies may extend a permanent job offer after 90 days. We handle everything until that job offer is extended. This process allows the company – and the employee – to feel each other out. One of the key analytics we study is our retention rate. In other words, we want our companies and employees to stick together. That’s our goal.

We only staff for one industry. While it’s true that staffing companies have specializations (BARRYSTAFF’s is manufacturing), many agencies are capable of recruiting for many, many fields. At BARRYSTAFF, we have placed architects, engineers and chemists. We have an entire team solely dedicated to filling clerical positions. So while manufacturing is our wheelhouse, we’ll never turn away someone looking for a communications position. Or graphic design. Or IT. We can help them too.

Job seekers have to pay to use our service. Job seekers pay nothing. Zero. Zilch. That’s not how we make money. Instead, the companies we partner with pay us to help them find quality employees. No job seeker will ever need to pay a dime to a company like BARRYSTAFF.

We only offer dead end jobs. The fact of the matter is that there is plenty of room for advancement in the jobs we hire for. Many of our placements have gone on to management positions.

We only work with struggling companies (Why else would they need a staffing company?) This is one we have to push back against fairly often. We work with big companies and small companies. Some are international. Others are hyper local. They use us because it is time-consuming to search, interview and drug screen candidates. It’s expensive. It cuts down on production. Advertising alone can run up a hefty tab. And these days, the job search is changing drastically from year to year. We live in a fast-paced digital world now, and our clients need to stay focused on what they’re doing. More of them are trusting experts like BARRYSTAFF to handle this work. It’s a specialized service during a time of rapid change.

And our services don’t stop at staffing. We often find ourselves working as a fully- functional HR branch for companies. It’s just another amenity we’re proud to offer.

 

 

How Do Staffing Agencies Work? 5 Tips for the Employer

By Robert Half

Does your business need short-term help during a busy period? Are you short-staffed, yet not ready to hire a full-time employee? Maybe you’re wondering, “How do staffing agencies work — and do I need one when I have only temporary or seasonal hiring needs?”

Hiring solutions come in all sizes. Full time, yes, but also temporary, temporary-to-full-time, contract and project. Whatever your hiring needs, a top-rated, professional staffing agency gives you quick access to highly skilled professionals you might not find on your own. That eases the workload and provides peace of mind that none of your important projects will be delayed and no details will slip through the cracks.

So how do staffing agencies work — and how can you work most effectively with them? Here are five tips for optimizing your experience as a staffing agency client.

1. Engage a specialized staffing agency

When you work with a staffing agency, make sure it specializes in the type of staff you need. Non-specialized or generalist firms work with a broad variety of candidates, so finding someone with the exact skills and qualifications you need is more difficult and takes longer than if you work with a firm that’s focused on your field.

In addition, specialized staffing firms have a better sense of the candidate marketplace in your industry and geographic area and can effectively evaluate candidates’ experience and skills. Getting a good match the first time saves you time and money.

2. Communication is key

Try to speak with a staffing manager directly rather than communicating only via email. He or she will ask you about your staffing requirements and the length of time you need extra staff.

Make sure you create a job description that completely describes the position’s responsibilities so your recruiter knows the skills the candidate must have. (We’ve come up with a blueprint for creating a job description that can simplify the process.) Mention any policies your business follows, such as dress code, hours (including how you handle overtime) and breaks. These details help your representative get a sense of your corporate culture and what type of professional is likely to succeed there. When you feel you’ve clearly defined your needs, let the recruiter know. He or she will start the search immediately.

3. Get ready, get set …

Prepare your business and the office itself to accommodate a temporary professional. Maximize the benefits of temporary staff to your company and team by setting up in advance. Create a designated workspace. If a computer or phone is necessary, make sure it’s installed and functioning before the interim worker’s first day. And once you’ve brought in your new temporary worker, make him feel part of the team:

  • Ensure a smooth start by providing an orientation as you would for any new staff member. Make all appropriate team introductions and designate a point person for any questions that may arise.
  • Be inclusive and encourage team bonding by inviting the temporary worker to staff functions such as lunches, team meetings and other group efforts.
  • Check in with temporary professionals, as well as the staff members they interact with, to evaluate performance. Even if interim workers have the necessary skills, it’s important to achieve a good fit with your corporate culture as well.

4. Follow up

Providing feedback about the new worker to your staffing agency representative helps both the recruiter and yourself with any future talent searches. Notify the agency at once if there are any problems, and let the recruiter know what specific aspects of the individual’s performance have stood out.

5. Weigh fees vs. costs

For you, the client, there are fees associated with using a staffing agency, but the overall cost is typically a net savings for you if you go with the right firm. Because finding qualified, skilled employees can be time-consuming, you save time and money when you turn this process over to staffing experts. Plus, the most reputable staffing agencies are likely to offer a satisfaction guarantee. So if you aren’t happy with the employee, the firm will identify a replacement.

Communicate your goals and needs to the staffing agency recruiters every step of the way, and you’ll be in the best position to maximize your working relationship with them.

Read the original posting here.

 

 

From Homelessness to a New Promotion: Herb Thompson’s Inspirational Story

Herb Thompson at ASPM in Vandalia.

A few months ago Herb Thompson was homeless. Now he has a fully furnished apartment and a new outlook.

He’s also accepted a promotion.

“What more can you ask for?” he says with a smile.

Born and raised on a Preble County farm, Thompson moved to Dayton at 18 and  immediately found work in manufacturing.

“At 19 years old I was firing up million dollar equipment,” he recently told us.

He enlisted in the Navy worked as a technician for six years. Specifically, he specialized in electronic surveillance on submarines. When he returned to Dayton in the late 1990s, he learned that manufacturing had “fallen off completely.” So he worked for Auto Zone. And Time Warner Cable. For a while he operated a tow truck.

It became increasingly hard to find steady work. A tough job market mixed with a bad break or two led to homelessness.

Eventually the military veteran linked up with Volunteers of America. They referred him to BarryStaff. Within a week of interviewing with Barry, he was working at the ASPM plant in Vandalia.

Even then, he wasn’t super optimistic to begin working as a machine operator.

“It was the type of job I tried to avoid all my life,” he says. “I thought it would be mind numbing.”

Nevermind the repetitiveness, he was told. Work hard and you’ll quickly advance.

He took the advice and used the foot in the door to his advantage. He rolled up his sleeves and hunkered down. Within weeks, he could keep up with workers half his age. Thompson’s confidence grew. The promotion quickly followed.

“I now have an apartment — a wonderful little apartment. I’m gainfully employed. And I feel my value is being appreciated.”

He’s now working as a material handler, which comes with more responsibilities. Does he look back? Yes and no.

“I try not to look back too much,” he says. “However, those who forget the past are doomed to repeat it.”

Then Thompson, who has a way with words, quickly sizes up his journey.

“I’m happy,” he says. “If I was any happier I couldn’t stand myself.”